Hillary Clinton

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Nearly 200 people showed up at the Statehouse on Monday morning as part of a last-ditch effort to prevent Donald Trump from becoming president. 

Meg Kelly
NPR

Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump face off in the final presidential debate Wednesday night at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and NPR Politics is live-annotating the debate.

Matt Rourke, Evan Vucci / AP

A VPR poll of 579 likely voters suggests that Hillary Clinton will carry Vermont easily in this year’s presidential race, but it’s unclear whether she’ll provide the electoral lift to Vermont Democrats that Barack Obama delivered in the previous two presidential cycles.

Bill Clinton will campaign for his wife in New Hampshire on Monday. The former president plans to make stops at Keene State College and Dartmouth College in Hanover.

Angela Evancie/VPR; Andrew Harnik/AP

In half of the last eight presidential elections, Vermonters who split their vote between Republicans and Democrats have had a major impact on the outcome of the gubernatorial race.

Saul Loeb / AP

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the second presidential debate Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and NPR's politics team is live-annotating the debate.

David Goldman / AP

Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican Mike Pence square off in the vice-presidential debate Tuesday night, and NPR's politics team is live annotating the debate.

New Poll Shows Clinton Up Over Trump In New Hampshire

Sep 30, 2016
David Goldman / AP

A new poll from WBUR Boston shows Hillary Clinton leads Donald Trump by seven points among likely voters in New Hampshire, one of the key battleground states that could determine the outcome of the presidential election.

The first presidential debate was a tense affair between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump as they clashed over their economic and trade plans, national security and race relations in the U.S.

The Republican nominee came out aggressively against Clinton, often interrupting her and talking over her, but the Democratic nominee didn't pull her punches either and had plenty of zingers ready. And as the night wore on, Trump appeared repeatedly rattled as he was pressed on his past support for the birther movement and controversial comments about women.

Evan Vucci / AP

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump go head-to-head tonight in the first presidential debate, and NPR's politics team will be live annotating the debate.

Matt Rourke / AP

If the mood of the Vermont delegation is any indication, then Hillary Clinton’s acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention Thursday night played all right with Bernie Sanders supporters who have until now been skeptical of her candidacy.

Hillary Clinton accepted her party's nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.

Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump's Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

The media covering the Democratic convention this week have focused relentlessly on the alleged divide between Bernie Sanders’ devotees and presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. But is the Bernie-or-Bust narrative as real — or as relevant — as your news feeds might be making it out to be?

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

On Tuesday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Sen. Bernie Sanders put an official end to his presidential candidacy by formally moving to nominate Hillary Clinton as the nominee.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Vermont’s delegates to the Democratic National Convention are in Philadelphia this week for the culmination of the 2016 presidential primary. But not all of them are going to be happy to witness the coronation of Hillary Clinton. Some Vermont delegates are struggling to pledge political allegiance to anyone other than Bernie Sanders.

John Locher / AP

Democrats opened their national convention in Philadelphia by front-loading some of their highest profile speakers on the event's first night.

First Lady Michelle Obama made an impassioned speech; Massachusetts Senator and progressive darling Elizabeth Warren spoke as well. But there was no more anticipated speaker on stage Monday night than Vermont's own Bernie Sanders.

Emily Alfin Johson / VPR

“Unity” seems to be the one-word mantra that Democratic National Committee officials are using to frame this week’s national convention in Philadelphia. But many Vermont delegates aren’t ready to hold political hands with their party’s presumptive nominee quite yet.

Alex Brandon / AP

The 2016 Democratic presidential primary was in some ways as much as referendum on the nominating process as it was on the candidates themselves. A key committee at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia has now moved to curb the influence of so-called superdelegates on the primary process, and several Vermonters helped lead the push for the changes.

Amid furor over an email leak that revealed a bias against Bernie Sanders inside the Democratic National Committee, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced Sunday she will step down as chair.

Wasserman Schultz will still open and close the convention, she said in a statement, and "address our delegates about the stakes involved in this election not only for Democrats, but for all Americans."

With just one weekend to go before Hillary Clinton is expected to accept her party's nomination for president, WikiLeaks on Friday released almost 20,000 emails sent and received by Democratic National Committee staff members from January 2015 to May 2016 – leaving journalists scouring for information potentially damaging to the party.

Pages