History

OGphoto / iStock.com

If you’ve lived in a state for a long time, or grew up there, you probably have this feeling — when you drive into or out of it, you feel like you can tell the difference.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott says that he will proclaim Oct. 9, 2017 as Indigenous People's Day in Vermont. This is the same date on which the federal holiday Columbus Day falls this year.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Grafton Cornet Band is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year.

Men panning for gold in an 1887 photograph from the Plymouth Historical Society.
E. G. Davis / Plymouth Historical Society, courtesy

You've probably heard about the California gold rush of 1849 — but did you know that Vermont had its own mini-gold rush beginning around that same time?

The steeple on the Unitarian Universalist church at the head of Church Street in Burlington.
Historic American Buildings Survey / Library of Congress

A simple question about the history of Burlington's Church Street yielded some interesting trivia about the city, and the commercial district that now defines downtown.

An angled upstairs window, or "witch window," on a house in Wolcott, Vermont.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

You might have seen this architectural oddity on an old Vermont farmhouse, even if you didn’t know what to call it. 

In the 1850s, a small but vibrant community grew up around a gold mining operation in the Plymouth-Bridgewater area. Called Plymouth Five Corners, it had a hotel, a school and a dance hall.
E.G. Davis / Plymouth Historical Society

This month on Brave Little State, we’re doing things a little differently. Instead of taking on one of your questions about Vermont, we’re taking on three — in a kind of local history lightning round.

Courtesy Bloomsbury Academic

Former House Speaker John McCormack might be the most important political leader most people don't remember - or may not have even heard of. His time as a Massachusetts congressman spanned the presidencies of Calvin Coolidge to Richard Nixon, and he served as Speaker of the House during the turbulent years from 1962-1971.

A recent issue of Vermont Life magazine. A recent issue of Vermont Life magazine. The state is now accepting offers for the publication.
Henry Epp / VPR

In 2017, should the state of Vermont still be supporting a promotional magazine? That’s a question lawmakers put forward in this year’s state budget.

In the early 20th century, Vermont was among a group of states that had policies on the books based on eugenics — the idea that the human population could be controlled to bring out what were considered "desirable" characteristics.

Weybridge Elementary School fourth-grader Juliette Hunsdorfer shows off a copy of 'The War That Saved My Life,' while sixth-grader Narges Anzali listens to another reader's comments about the book.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The War That Saved My Life, by author Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, is a World War II-era story about a girl and her brother who have a chance to escape their cruel childhood when London is evacuated during the war.

The town of Hartford will vote next year on whether to change the name of the October holiday "Columbus Day" to "Indigenous People's Day."

J. Scott Applewhite / AP file

Sent from Vermont to Washington as a U.S. senator for the first time in 1974, Patrick Leahy has served longer than any other current member of the Senate.

Patti Daniels / VPR

Erica Hecht now lives in Stowe, but was born in Hungary in 1934. She is a child survivor of the Holocaust, and Hecht's mother converted from Judaism to Catholicism in an attempt to protect her family from persecution.

Patti Daniels / VPR

Sunday began the annual observance of Yom HaShoah, a day of remembrance for victims and survivors of the Holocaust.  In communities around Vermont, people gathered to share their own families' history of escape and survival from the genocide of Jews during World War II.

Angela Evancie / VPR

For our next episode, Brave Little State is taking on a question about falling-down Vermont barns. And we want your pictures!

Waterville Elementary School students sit around a table.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Students at Waterville Elementary School are gathered around a classroom table, deep in discussion about the characters in A Night Divided, especially the book's main character – 12-year-old Gerta, who lives in East Berlin.

Angela Evancie / VPR

This month on Brave Little State, the history of Vermont’s whiteness — both racial and cultural — and stories from people of color about what it’s like to live here.

Courtesy

Organizers in Rutland hope public sculptures will attract visitors and help celebrate the region’s long ties to the marble industry. 

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