History

Weybridge Elementary School fourth-grader Juliette Hunsdorfer shows off a copy of 'The War That Saved My Life,' while sixth-grader Narges Anzali listens to another reader's comments about the book.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The War That Saved My Life, by author Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, is a World War II-era story about a girl and her brother who have a chance to escape their cruel childhood when London is evacuated during the war.

The town of Hartford will vote next year on whether to change the name of the October holiday "Columbus Day" to "Indigenous People's Day."

J. Scott Applewhite / AP file

Sent from Vermont to Washington as a U.S. senator for the first time in 1974, Patrick Leahy has served longer than any other current member of the Senate.

Patti Daniels / VPR

Erica Hecht now lives in Stowe, but was born in Hungary in 1934. She is a child survivor of the Holocaust, and Hecht's mother converted from Judaism to Catholicism in an attempt to protect her family from persecution.

Patti Daniels / VPR

Sunday began the annual observance of Yom HaShoah, a day of remembrance for victims and survivors of the Holocaust.  In communities around Vermont, people gathered to share their own families' history of escape and survival from the genocide of Jews during World War II.

Angela Evancie / VPR

For our next episode, Brave Little State is taking on a question about falling-down Vermont barns. And we want your pictures!

Waterville Elementary School students sit around a table.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Students at Waterville Elementary School are gathered around a classroom table, deep in discussion about the characters in A Night Divided, especially the book's main character – 12-year-old Gerta, who lives in East Berlin.

Angela Evancie / VPR

This month on Brave Little State, the history of Vermont’s whiteness — both racial and cultural — and stories from people of color about what it’s like to live here.

Courtesy

Organizers in Rutland hope public sculptures will attract visitors and help celebrate the region’s long ties to the marble industry. 

Twenty-first century technology has made its way onto a 19th-century building in Hamden. WNPR recently visited the headquarters of the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, which just installed solar panels on its office.

Steve Zind / VPR

There’s always a demand for work gloves. If the only trick to selling them is to make sure they’re well-made, then Green Mountain Glove Company should be doing OK. But time and change have taken their toll on the Randolph manufacturer.

Courtesy Dede Cummings

Acclaimed Vermont author Howard Frank Mosher has died. Mosher, 74, succumbed to cancer Sunday morning at his home in Irasburg.

Olga R. Rodriguez / AP

Marches are planned in Washington and across the country this week as Donald Trump takes office. In Vermont, simultaneous protests against Trump are also being organized. We're talking about the history of political protest: what forms it has taken and what it can accomplish.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

British-born Brattleboro resident Denise "Jane" Ashworth has been defying expectations her whole life. She was a translator in World War II, she was among the first women to work the trails for the U.S. Forest Service — and now she's self-published her first children's book.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Jake Burton Carpenter's first snowboard factory was in the southern Vermont resort town of Londonderry, near the Stratton and Bromley ski areas, and now the town wants to install a sculpture to let everyone know.

Steve Zind / VPR

The year 1816 has many nicknames in Vermont: "the year without a summer'" "the poverty year;" "the starving year;" and even, with a touch of black humor, as "eighteen-hundred-and-froze-to-death." 

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Rescuers: Portraits of Moral Courage in the Holocaust

A one-time Vermont resident who was honored for her work saving the lives of Jews during World War II has died. 

Harvard University Press

A populist and nativist political movement stunned skeptics when it swept into office after a fiercely contested election. That might describe the victory of President-elect Donald Trump, but it’s also true of the 1854 election, when the Know Nothing Party won nearly every elective office in Massachusetts.

Claudio Cruz / AP

After Chile's right-wing coup in 1973, Chilean songwriter and activist Victor Jara was tortured and killed – but he and his music became a powerful symbol of hope in Latin America and beyond.

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