History

Courtesy Aron Garceau

In this Halloween special from Brave Little State, a terrifying compendium of spine-tingling Vermont ghost stories, as told to us by … you.

AP

Last week Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, becoming the first American since Toni Morrison to receive that honor. During his five decades of making music, he played countless shows, and on one of his most famous tours, he came through Vermont.

Courtesy of Henry Holt and Company

As the United States was fighting furiously to throw off the shackles of British oppression in the late 1700s, nearly a million people were enslaved in American colonies. That number would reach around four million by the 1860 census. So how did Washington, Jefferson and some of the other founding fathers justify the nation's freedom from England while denying it to enslaved people?

Mark Shaw

If the vulgar presidential race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump has you pining for simpler times, a new photo exhibit on the John F. Kennedy presidency might be just the medicine to help make it through to Election Day.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Gov. Peter Shumlin has issued an executive proclamation re-naming this year's Columbus Day holiday as Indigenous People's Day.

Meg Malone / VPR

Cyclists were out enjoying the sunny weather in Middlebury this weekend, including some perched atop antique bicycles from the 1800s.

"Steampunk" combines the style of the Victorian era with the futuristic ideas of writers like Jules Verne and H.G. Wells. Beginning on Friday, Springfield will be hosting its second annual Steampunk Festival.

Scott McCracken / Flickr Creative Commons

Brave Little State is answering a question about Vermont's best ghost stories — and we want to collect your creepiest tales for a Halloween podcast extra.

Anonymous / AP

Forty years ago, when we turned on the radio, we were hearing "Show Me the Way," the first hit from the album Frampton Comes Alive!, which was released on Jan. 6, 1976. The songs from that album came from four concerts, and one of them was held on the campus of Plattsburgh State University in New York.

Courtesy of Kate Daloz

The 1970s were a time of huge change in Vermont, as the back-to-the land movement swept the country and communes dotted the state. We’re hearing stories from that era of transformation and looking at how 1970s counterculture shaped the state we know today.

Courtesy: National Life

A historic 50-foot-long mural will be the centerpiece of a renovation planned at the Vermont History Museum in Montpelier.

Courtesy of Mary Nemeth

Many people in Rutland are debating what impact new refugees would have on the city. But immigrants from Italy, Ireland and Eastern Europe have already left indelible marks on the city.

The Domes of the Yosemite painting by Albert Bierstadt hanging in the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum gallery.
Courtesy of Bob Joly / St. Johnsbury Athenaeum

Prepare to be overwhelmed by the grandeur of Yosemite when you walk into the the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. The library, art gallery and museum is a fixture in town, and Albert Bierstadt's painting The Domes of the Yosemite is a striking piece in its collection – but this painting is now nearly 150 years old, and it's showing its age.

Vermont State Archives, Ed Bolton, Chad Abramovich

A while back, Brave Little State got a question from Will Taylor, of Colchester, that we just couldn’t resist: “What is that bizarre thing at the Waterbury rest area?”

John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

As debate continues over Syrian refugees resettling in Rutland, we're taking a look at the history of immigration into Vermont. We'll look at waves of immigration into the state throughout the past centuries, and how the pre-existing population has received new Vermonters: Irish, French Canadians, Jews, and more.  And we'll talk about how immigration is tied to internal debates about our identity as a state.

Rebecca Sananes / VPR

A nearly 200-year-old schoolhouse has been moved back to its original site in the Orleans County town of Brownington. The historical move on Monday was powered by a team of oxen — in honor of the many buildings in New England that were moved by the sturdy animals.

Courtesy images

In the inaugural episode of Brave Little State, VPR's new, people-powered journalism podcast, we tackle a question about the history of the Vermont accent, and a question about a strange "thing" at the Waterbury rest area.

Wikimedia Commons / Brown University

If the mythology of America's founding has a villain - it's the traitor Benedict Arnold. A once-heroic Revolutionary War general who betrayed his country and nearly lost the war for the colonies.

Steve Zind / VPR

More than 50 years ago, in Southern Calfornia, a young Steve Gillette was just learning how to write songs when his little sister Darcy had a brush with a feisty horse, inspiring a now-familiar ballad.

"Darcy Farrow" has become part of the folk music lexicon, performed and recorded hundreds of times. 

Courtesy of the Del Bianco Family Collection

There are few more impressive combined engineering and artistic marvels in this country than Mount Rushmore in South Dakota. One of the individuals who had an integral role in its creation was its chief carver, Luigi Del Bianco, an Italian immigrant who spent some time as a stonemason in Barre.

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