History

"Steampunk" combines the style of the Victorian era with the futuristic ideas of writers like Jules Verne and H.G. Wells. Beginning on Friday, Springfield will be hosting its second annual Steampunk Festival.

Scott McCracken / Flickr Creative Commons

Brave Little State is answering a question about Vermont's best ghost stories — and we want to collect your creepiest tales for a Halloween podcast extra.

Anonymous / AP

Forty years ago, when we turned on the radio, we were hearing "Show Me the Way," the first hit from the album Frampton Comes Alive!, which was released on Jan. 6, 1976. The songs from that album came from four concerts, and one of them was held on the campus of Plattsburgh State University in New York.

Courtesy of Kate Daloz

The 1970s were a time of huge change in Vermont, as the back-to-the land movement swept the country and communes dotted the state. We’re hearing stories from that era of transformation and looking at how 1970s counterculture shaped the state we know today.

Courtesy: National Life

A historic 50-foot-long mural will be the centerpiece of a renovation planned at the Vermont History Museum in Montpelier.

Courtesy of Mary Nemeth

Many people in Rutland are debating what impact new refugees would have on the city. But immigrants from Italy, Ireland and Eastern Europe have already left indelible marks on the city.

The Domes of the Yosemite painting by Albert Bierstadt hanging in the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum gallery.
Courtesy of Bob Joly / St. Johnsbury Athenaeum

Prepare to be overwhelmed by the grandeur of Yosemite when you walk into the the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. The library, art gallery and museum is a fixture in town, and Albert Bierstadt's painting The Domes of the Yosemite is a striking piece in its collection – but this painting is now nearly 150 years old, and it's showing its age.

Vermont State Archives, Ed Bolton, Chad Abramovich

A while back, Brave Little State got a question from Will Taylor, of Colchester, that we just couldn’t resist: “What is that bizarre thing at the Waterbury rest area?”

John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

As debate continues over Syrian refugees resettling in Rutland, we're taking a look at the history of immigration into Vermont. We'll look at waves of immigration into the state throughout the past centuries, and how the pre-existing population has received new Vermonters: Irish, French Canadians, Jews, and more.  And we'll talk about how immigration is tied to internal debates about our identity as a state.

Rebecca Sananes / VPR

A nearly 200-year-old schoolhouse has been moved back to its original site in the Orleans County town of Brownington. The historical move on Monday was powered by a team of oxen — in honor of the many buildings in New England that were moved by the sturdy animals.

Courtesy images

In the inaugural episode of Brave Little State, VPR's new, people-powered journalism podcast, we tackle a question about the history of the Vermont accent, and a question about a strange "thing" at the Waterbury rest area.

Wikimedia Commons / Brown University

If the mythology of America's founding has a villain - it's the traitor Benedict Arnold. A once-heroic Revolutionary War general who betrayed his country and nearly lost the war for the colonies.

Steve Zind / VPR

More than 50 years ago, in Southern Calfornia, a young Steve Gillette was just learning how to write songs when his little sister Darcy had a brush with a feisty horse, inspiring a now-familiar ballad.

"Darcy Farrow" has become part of the folk music lexicon, performed and recorded hundreds of times. 

Courtesy of the Del Bianco Family Collection

There are few more impressive combined engineering and artistic marvels in this country than Mount Rushmore in South Dakota. One of the individuals who had an integral role in its creation was its chief carver, Luigi Del Bianco, an Italian immigrant who spent some time as a stonemason in Barre.

Don Shall / Flickr

This year marks the 100th anniversary of America's National Park Service. And when you think national parks, your mind may immediately go to the wide open spaces of Yellowstone or the Grand Canyon. The one we've got here in Vermont might not be the first you'd think of.

Weston Playhouse Theatre Company, courtesy.

Two Weston institutions are celebrating big anniversaries this month and the community plans to throw them a birthday party on Saturday, June 18. The Weston Playhouse Theatre Company is commemorating its 80th year and the Vermont Country Store is turning 70.

Jialiang Gao / Wikimedia Commons

The weather is often a topic of conversation, and 200 years ago, there was a lot to talk about. 1816 became known as “the year without a summer” after ash from a massive volcanic eruption in Indonesia blotted out much of the light from the sun and had major effects on the weather across the globe.

Nina Keck / VPR

Vermonters honored veterans on Monday at Memorial Day commemorations and parades across the state.  In Brandon several hundred people attended services that locals say have been held in the town center for nearly 150 years.

Toby Talbot / AP File Photo

Fifteen years ago today, a senator from Vermont triggered a political earthquake. Sen. Jim Jeffords declared his independence from the Republican party on May 24, 2001.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Brattleboro Retreat has reclaimed a historic cemetery that was a burial place for patients who died while being treated at the psychiatric hospital.

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