Immigration

Refugee resettlement agencies receive funding based on the number of people they anticipate resettling, so the uncertainty around President Trump’s travel ban has serious fiscal consequences.

Jeff Thielman is the CEO of the International Institute of New England, a resettlement agency working in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. His agency expects eight refugees to arrive by March 28.

The number of people detained in New Hampshire by federal immigration authorities since Donald Trump took office was greater than the number detained any of the previous six months. 

Summer resorts around the nation are bracing for a tough season — not because the tourists won’t come, but because the workers might not. The reinstatement of a cap on visas for temporary workers has some in the hospitality industry predicting catastrophe.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Many recent immigrants living in the U.S. are scared that their claims for asylum won't have a fair hearing by the Trump administration. Hundreds of those people are fleeing to Canada — and for one man, the journey through the frigid, snowy woods nearly killed him.  

Courtesy of Migrant Justice

Leaders of the advocacy group Migrant Justice say ICE agents arrested a former Vermont dairy farmworker and another advocate in Burlington Friday afternoon.

Courtesy Migrant Justice

A local advocacy group says federal immigration agents arrested a Vermont dairy worker in Burlington Wednesday morning. Representatives from Migrant Justice say Alex Carrillo, 23, was stopped by agents in plainclothes as he and his wife were parking near the Chittenden County courthouse.  

Angela Evancie / VPR file

House lawmakers advanced a bill Tuesday that tries to limit the role of Vermont police in federal immigration-enforcement activities. And while the proposal has won support across party lines in Montpelier, some Republicans say they worry the legislation could undermine border security.

Marco Garcia / AP

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan was one of 10 state attorneys general who filed an amicus brief Monday in support of the State of Hawaii's effort to block President Trump's latest immigration orders.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Many refugees who arrive on U.S. soil finally feel safe after decades of war or torture or loss of family members. But just because they're removed from physical harm, it doesn't mean the pain is over. 

My grandparents arrived in America, refugees of a genocide perpetrated by an Islamic government against its Christian citizens.

Like many school districts across the country, Providence, Rhode Island Public Schools have a rapidly growing population of English language learners and programs to help them learn their new language. The problem is the state doesn’t have enough teachers certified to teach these students.

Canada’s in our DNA, literally.

Canadians, blue collar and white, have always been drawn south to the United States by economic opportunity. Between 1840 and 1930, nearly one million French Canadians migrated to New England’s mill towns; and knowledge workers like physicians, engineers and entertainers, drifted south thereafter.

Steven Pappas / Times Argus

A number of Vermont communities took up Town Meeting resolutions in response to intensified deportations of undocumented immigrants and President Trump’s new order suspending all refugee resettlement and barring visas for citizens of six Muslim-majority countries.

Volunteer lawyers in Boston are standing by Monday in anticipation of the impact of President Donald Trump's revised executive order halting travel for immigrants from six Muslim-majority nations. The president's existing order was put on hold by federal courts. The new order was signed on Monday, and goes into effect on March 16.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

As high volumes of migrants flee the United States to apply for asylum in Canada, one popular route into Quebec is just west of Lake Champlain. To get to the snowy illegal crossing, many are calling a cab.

But there's a catch: Some of those cabbies are coordinating with U.S. Border Patrol, and that practice has some civil liberties advocates concerned.  

Angela Evancie / VPR file

A bill that won unanimous approval in the Vermont Senate last week appears likely to face a partisan split in the House. 

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Last week, the Vermont Senate gave unanimous approval to a bill that would limit Vermont’s role in federal immigration enforcement. And for a group of young Vermonters on hand to witness the Senate debate, the legislation hits particularly close to home.

Patti Daniels / VPR

Vermont's Republican governor asked the Legislature to deliver a state law that blunts some of federal law enforcement's ability to identify undocumented people for deportation. The state Senate unanimously agreed, and now the House will weigh in. So where do Republican legislators stand on the question?

Almost a century ago in Charlottesville, Virginia, Carrie Buck’s mother had been institutionalized for what was then called feeblemindedness.

As immigration officials ramp up deportation of new classes of unauthorized immigrants, more residents and visitors without documents fear run-ins with police.

On New Hampshire's diverse Southern border, a traffic stop in one town could lead to very different consequences than the same kind of stop one town over.

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