Immigration

The golden dome of the Vermont Statehouse with a blue sky background.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

It’s been five weeks since lawmakers kicked off the 2017 legislative session, meaning the session is about a quarter over. Here are three issues that lawmakers are trying to tackling this year.

A Canadian woman who was traveling to Burlington for a day of shopping says she was denied entry to the United States last weekend. She says it's because of her religion.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Sunday Mass is no longer held at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception at Pine and Cherry streets, but once a month a Vietnamese priest comes down from Montreal to perform Mass in Vietnamese for the local community.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

As President Donald Trump tries to use his executive authority to impose heightened border-security measures across the United States, elected officeholders in Vermont are using a variety of legal maneuvers to thwart Trump’s new immigration policies.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

At the School for International Training in Brattleboro, students and staff are still trying to understand the impact of President Trump's controversial travel ban on refugees and visa holders.

Patti Daniels / VPR

The legal fight continues over who can and can't enter the United States in the wake of the Trump administration's executive order on immigration and refugees. 

Nina Keck / VPR

Among the 650,000 Syrians who have sought safety in neighboring Jordan are farmers who had to leave their own land behind and who are now getting by as migrant farm workers.

Patti Daniels / VPR

The federal court ruling this weekend on U.S. immigration policy means that refugee arrivals to Vermont could restart in the next 10 days.

Updated at 4:13 a.m. ET Sunday

President Trump's travel ban remains suspended, after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit denied a Justice Department request to stay the suspension of President Trump's order.

The court asked opponents of the ban to respond to the Trump administration's appeal by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. PT; the court asked the Justice Department to respond by Monday at 3 p.m. PT.

Updated at 4:30 a.m. ET Saturday

A federal judge in Seattle has issued a nationwide temporary stay against President Trump's executive order that prevented citizens of seven mostly Muslim countries from entering the United States. Judge James Robart acted to stop implementation of the order while a case brought by the states of Washington and Minnesota is heard.

The White House issued a statement Friday night, saying the Justice Department will appeal the Seattle judge's action:

A shooting at a mosque in Quebec City on Sunday left six dead and 19 wounded. Police arrested one suspect who has been charged with six counts of first-degree murder and five counts of attempted murder.

Nina Keck / VPR

Reporter Nina Keck is in Jordan this week to report on what life is like for Syrian refugees awaiting resettlement. Along the way, Keck has bumped into Vermonters working to support them.

Nina Keck / VPR

President Trump’s executive order suspending refugee resettlement recently put the brakes on Rutland's plans to welcome 100 refugees. The policy change is impacting thousands of families, including the Alzoubanis, who were getting ready to move to Detroit, Michigan.

Jeb Wallace-Brodeur / Times Argus

In below-freezing temperatures, a large crowd of people holding candles showed up to the Statehouse in Montpelier Wednesday evening, showing support for the Muslim and refugee communities in Vermont.

Nina Keck / VPR

About 8 miles from the Syrian border in Jordan is the world's second-largest refugee camp. The sprawling temporary city is home to about 80,000 Syrians who fled their country’s civil war.

Middlebury College, courtesy

Ata Anzali is an assistant professor of religion at Middlebury College and an Iranian citizen with a green card. He's been in Iran on sabbatical doing research, and he is now dealing with the issue of when to return to the United States with his wife and children.

As President Trump's executive order was sparking confusion in the U.S. this weekend, VPR's Nina Keck was on her way to Jordan, where many Syrian refugees are waiting to be resettled in the U.S. and elsewhere. 

Robert F. Bukaty / AP

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote this week on the nomination of Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions as the country's next attorney general. Sen. Patrick Leahy spoke to VPR about Sesssions' nomination and a number of policies proposed by President Trump during his first week in office.  

Craig Ruttle / AP

President Donald Trump's far-reaching executive orders on immigration rocked the country last week, and the reaction has been widespread and furious.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

Gov. Phil Scott says Vermont will not cooperate with a federal crackdown on immigration that calls on state and local officials to aid in heightened border-security measures. And he says his administration is "exploring a legal challenge" to executive orders signed by President Donald Trump last week.

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