Jim Condos

Secretary of State Jim Condos, left, and Tess Taylor, vice chair of the Vermont Democratic Party, certify election results at Condos' office Tuesday.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Fears of low turnout for Vermont’s midsummer primary proved to be unfounded, as the final vote counts certified by the Secretary of State’s office Tuesday show historically high participation in last week’s primary elections.

Secretary of State Jim Condos says Vermont has instituted a number of security measures to prevent malicious hackers from breaching the state's elections systems.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

A cybersecurity firm hired earlier this year to try to hack into Vermont’s elections system uncovered a potential vulnerability, according to records requested by VPR. But Secretary of State Jim Condos says his office has since mitigated the risk.

An image of the Vermont state flag.
btgbtg / iStock.com

Early voting for the Aug. 14 Vermont primary election is underway.

Voters now have just over six weeks to cast a ballot in the major party contests for statewide and legislative races.

Sec. of State Jim Condos discusses how states like Vermont could be vulnerable to election meddling, and what's needed to secure future elections.
Toby Talbot / AP File

Thirteen Russians face indictments for interfering in the 2016 presidential election. Last year, the Department of Homeland Security identified more than 20 states whose voting systems were compromised by Russian hackers. As they face concerns over election integrity both inside and outside the ballot box, how are Vermont officials keeping future elections secure?

States Seek To Prevent Election Hacking

Feb 22, 2018

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Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos is urging Congress to release nearly $400 million from a special fund to help states upgrade their voting systems to protect them from future cyberattacks.

Although many vote tabulators in Vermont are 20 years old, Condos says it would be extremely difficult for anyone to hack into these machines.

Secretary of State Jim Condos joins Vermont Edition to discuss several voting issues, including the president's election integrity commission.
Darron Cummings / Associated Press

In May, President Trump signed an executive order creating the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity. Secretary of State Jim Condos joins us to share his thoughts on the need for the commission.

Secretary of State Jim Condos says he doesn't trust the agenda of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity
Bob Kinzel / VPR file

Secretary of State Jim Condos says Vermont will take whatever steps are needed to protect the state's voter data base from a national commission created by President Trump.

Secretary of State Jim Condos says he doesn't trust the agenda of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity
Bob Kinzel / VPR file

Secretary of State Jim Condos says that for now he won't send any Vermont voter information to the Presidential Election Integrity Commission.

Voters make their choice in Montpelier in this file photo. We're talking about what information the state collects on voters, and how that information is managed.
Toby Talbot / AP

The Trump administration's Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity has requested that states hand over detailed personal information on voters.  Vermont Edition talks to Secretary of State Jim Condos about how he plans to respond to the controversial request.

Secretary of State Jim Condos says he doesn't trust the agenda of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity
Bob Kinzel / VPR file

Secretary of State Jim Condos says President Donald Trump's Election Integrity Commission is a "partisan witch hunt" that has the goal of suppressing voting rights in the U.S. And for the time being, Condos says he will not comply with the commission's request that he turn over Vermont's voter data base to the panel.

Montpelier City Clerk John Odum with one of the city's optical scan voting machines.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

Secretary of State Jim Condos says his office is actively taking steps to protect the state's election system from being manipulated by foreign or domestic computer hackers, but says there's no evidence so far to indicate that Vermont's voting system was breached.

Responding to a report that 39 state election systems were targeted by cyberattacks during the 2016 elections, Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos said Tuesday that state officials aren’t aware of any evidence that Vermont’s elections systems were targeted.

Sec. of State Jim Condos discusses how states like Vermont could be vulnerable to election meddling, and what's needed to secure future elections.
Toby Talbot / AP File

Problems with the implementation of Vermont’s automatic voter registration system led to some Vermont residents who are not eligible to vote being added to the state’s voter rolls, officials say, adding that no ineligible voters had the chance to fraudulently vote in any elections.

Vermont's attorney general and secretary of state are launching a committee to examine Vermont's current campaign finance laws and recommend changes.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

Backers of legislation that would create an Ethics Commission in Vermont say they're optimistic about the future of their bill. But some critics argue that the proposal doesn't go nearly far enough to restore public trust in the operations of government.

Oliver Parini for VPR / file

Vermont has become the 14th state in the country to adopt an “Election Day Registration” statute that allows eligible voters to cast a ballot on the same day they register to vote.

Andrew Harnik / AP

According to the official results from last Tuesday's election, a record number of Vermonters voted using an early ballot. The results also show that Sen. Bernie Sanders received almost 6 percent of the vote in the presidential race as a write-in candidate.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP

Republican Phil Scott will be Vermont's next governor. Progressive/Democrat David Zuckerman won the race for lieutenant governor, and T.J. Donovan will be Vermont's first new attorney general since 1997.

Emily Alfin Johnson & Angela Evancie / VPR

According to the latest VPR Poll, Vermonters have been following the races for president and governor very closely. But the rest of the Vermont races, not so much. It's OK — that's where we come in.

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