Kids & Parenting

VPR's home for content that focuses on kids and parenting.

Have a voracious reader? 

Explore Dorothy's List, VPR's book club for kids.

Each month we highlight a book nominated for the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children’s Book Award. We visit schools and libraries where the book is being read, check out how young readers are interacting with the book and relay students’ questions to the author. Explore the list.

Have curious kiddos?

Check out VPR's podcast made just for kids — But Why!

Find the latest episodes at butwhykids.org or subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

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Illustrator Harry Bliss, his dog Penny, author Kate DiCamillo and The Flying Pig Bookstore owner Elizabeth Bluemle pose at The Film House, in Burlington. All three (humans) happen to be creators of picture books about dogs, published by Candlewick Press.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Over the weekend, a crowd of picture book fans got a chance to meet award-winning author Kate DiCamillo and illustrator Harry Bliss, a part-time Burlington resident. Attendees also got to know one of the furry, four-legged inspirations for the duo's new picture book.

The two toddlers currently enrolled at LouLou's Pre-K & Family Child Care have a lot of books and toys to choose from. Once the home day care is licensed by the state, up to ten children will be allowed to enroll.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

If you've ever looked for child care in Vermont, you know it can be tough to find openings. But it can also be a tough, and expensive, process for providers to open up and register with the state.

The organization Vermont Birth to Five is trying to help make it easier. 

We're looking  at the debates around how much independence to allow to kids.
_jure / iStock

Are today's parents overprotecting their kids and setting them up for failure? Or just keeping them safe? We're talking about the tricky balancing act between independence and safety, and what it means for kids’ development. 

Prevention Works! VT is hoping to make marijuana a less desirable choice for youth in Vermont.
Jessica Hyde / istock

It's now legal to possess and grow limited amounts of marijuana under Vermont law if you're over 21. The law, which was passed in January, took effect on Sunday.

Julie Jacobson / AP

When I heard that the Miss America Pageant was ditching its swimsuit competition, I thought … it’s about time.

The World Health Organization now recognizes what it calls "gaming disorder," but treatment and what qualifies under the disorder is still being defined.
vitapix / iStock

Kids can easily lose themselves in the virtual worlds of video games, but what happens when gaming goes beyond a hobby and becomes a problem? The World Health Organization now recognizes “gaming disorder,” and we're looking at the details of the diagnosis and what it means for kids in Vermont.

Vermont's domestic violence intervention programs see about 300 men each year in programs designed to stop intimate partner violence. The programs seek to change attitudes and behavior to end a cycle of abuse.
Benjavisa / iStock

More than one thousand people were charged with domestic violence in Vermont last year. In just the last month, the state has seen several shocking murders involving what investigators have described as long histories of domestic violence.

The plight of the victims rightfully gets most of the attention. But for every victim of abuse, there is an abuser. We're looking at what help is available to stop abusers from continuing the pattern of violence. 

The number of adults  living with their parents is increasing. We're talking about these living situations and how they can work.
Kwanchai Khammuean / iStock

You might have seen a story making the rounds about a 30-year-old forced by a court to leave his parents' house. It's an oddball example of what is an increasingly common arrangement: adult children living with their parents.

We're talking about reasons people might choose this situation, and how they make it work (or alternatively, ways it can go wrong).

Kids, parents and schools all are still figuring out how to deal with the increased connectivity offered by smartphones and social media.
milicad / iStock

Kids are growing up amidst the constant connectivity offered by smartphones and social media. We're talking about how parents, schools and young people themselves think about the technology in their lives and how they use it so that the benefits outweigh the risks.

The cover of "Llama Llama and the Bully Goat," one of Vermont author Anna Dewdney's hugely popular children's books.
Courtesy / Reed Duncan

A new animated series based on the popular Llama Llama children's books series debuts Jan. 26 on Netflix. Anna Dewdney, a southern Vermont author and illustrator and the series' creator, died in 2016 at the age of 50. Her longtime partner, Reed Duncan, spoke with Vermont Edition about how her work continues to find new audiences.

The Boy Scouts are opening their program to girls. Vermont Edition talks about scouting for boys and girls in Vermont Monday, Oct. 23.
gloch / iStock

The Boy Scouts of America this month officially welcomed girls for the first time in their century-long history. Girls will be able to enroll in the entry-level Cub Scout program by 2018, with a path toward ranks like Eagle Scouts in the coming years. But after decades of declining membership, is it a bold move toward inclusion or a necessary change for a struggling organization?

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Parents of small children will know the angst of figuring out the best way to try to get them to sleep through the night.

Keeping kids with allergies away from certain foods is a serious business. We're talking about how schools handle the challenge.
jjpoole / iStock

Serious — potentially deadly — food allergies are on the rise among kids. We're looking at how schools manage these situations, with limited resources and a diverse population of children to keep educated and fed. 

Fezzik the puppy on the day he met his new family in Vermont. He began his life in Alabama before making his way to a foster family in Pennsylvania and then finally to his permanent Vermont home.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

A few months ago, I shared some sad news about losing my dog Grendel after nearly 13 years of companionship. But now there's some happier news to share.

Nam Y. Huh / AP/file

Type 1 diabetes is a struggle for the kids who have it, and for their parents who keep a constant watch on them. And while the risks of not precisely managing the disease are enormous, technology is making huge strides in helping patients with the illness.

Musicians and child care advocates gathered at a Burlington recording studio last week to work on the arrangement for 'Something Beautiful'. Shown here, from the left, are Chris Dorman, Anna Gebhardt, Kat Wright, Bob Wagner and Josh Weinstein.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

If all goes as organizers plan, a 1,000-person flash mob will be singing and dancing on Church Street in Burlington October 1 in support of adequate early childhood care for Vermont's kids.

Dr. James Hudziak, a professor at UVM's Larner College of Medicine, developed an app to help coach college students on healthy behaviors. Hudziak has now received a $1.8 million grant to study the app's effectiveness.
PeopleImages / iStock

A University of Vermont program designed to help college students form healthy behaviors could go national with the help of nearly $2 million in grant money. 

People of all abilities can find hiking trails to suit them in Vermont. (Some are muddier than others.)
Patti Daniels / VPR

These long summer days in Vermont are fantastic, but how do you get the most out of the season without breaking the bank? We crowd-sourced your ideas for inexpensive — better yet, free! — ways to enjoy summer.

A couple years ago, Manchester police lieutenant Nicole LeDoux and two colleagues decided to crunch some numbers. They found that in a single year, 400 Manchester kids had been at either domestic violence incidents or overdoses when police were called.  LeDoux is a fast talker who oversees the juvenile and domestic violence units. “I remember sitting,” she said, “and being like ‘man, that’s a lot of kids. How do we deal with that?’” 

Nina Keck / VPR

Rutland's Wonderfeet Kids' Museum was launched by volunteers in an empty downtown storefront in 2011. As its role in the community has grown, officials hope an ambitious fundraiser scheduled for this weekend will help the museum further expand its services.

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