Lake Champlain

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Sen. Patrick Leahy denounced the president's budget priorities, which would cut funding to environment and health research programs in order to increase defense spending. Leahy says budget cuts at the Environmental Protection Agency would have a direct impact in Vermont.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

A key legislative committee is recommending $31 million in new taxes and fees annually to clean up Lake Champlain and other Vermont water bodies, prompting a swift rebuke from a Republican governor who says the “baffling” proposal will hurt businesses and “make Vermont less affordable.”

Angela Evancie / VPR file

A plan to fund water-quality improvements by assessing a per-parcel fee on all property owners in Vermont is already drawing opposition in Montpelier.

Photo courtesy Lake Champlain Basin Program

One-point-three billion dollars. That's the total amount the state thinks it needs to clean up Lake Champlain and other waterways over the next 20 years.  So where does the money come from? The Treasurer's Office has just released a report that maps out how to raise most of that funding.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/File

If lawmakers go along with the recommendations outlined in a long-awaited report released late Sunday night, then property owners across Vermont will pick up much of the tab for a water-quality improvement initiative expected to cost almost $1 billion over the next 20 years.

Vermont Fish & Wildlife

Lake sturgeon look like the fish you don't want to meet in a dark alley. They are big, old, and mean looking.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

The incoming leader of Vermont's environmental agency says there is one factor that has made water quality issues more complicated over the years: climate change.

fotoguy22 / iStock

The new leader of the state's environmental agency is no stranger to the cleanup effort for Lake Champlain. Julie Moore is the newly named Agency of Natural Resources secretary and she's among our guests on the next Vermont Edition.

Environmental watchdogs say they’re heartened by Governor-elect Phil Scott’s pick to lead the Agency of Natural Resources, but that it’s too early to discern whether the incoming Republican administration is serious about cleaning up Lake Champlain and tackling some of the other major environmental issues facing Vermont.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/File

Next month, Vermont Treasurer Beth Pearce will unveil a much-anticipated legislative report that will tell lawmakers how to raise the $1.3 billion needed to clean up Lake Champlain and other polluted waterways. And Governor-elect Phil Scott may soon find himself at odds with Democrats — and environmental advocates — over how to come up with the money.

Courtesy / Lake Champlain International

State officials identified a potentially toxic bloom of cyanobacteria – also known as blue-green algae – in Mallets Bay earlier this week, after they had stopped monitoring the lake for the blooms for the season.

fotoguy22 / iStock

When the Environmental Protection Agency mandated regulations for the cleanup of Lake Champlain, one concern was whether Vermont could actually meet those standards. Now a new study suggests that the bar the EPA has set may actually be too low, because the lake may be more susceptible to climate change than previously thought.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Lake Champlain water levels approached record lows this summer, which exposed acres of beach sand that would normally be underwater.  This allowed some rare — and a few endangered— species of sand-dwelling grass plants to blossom, some of which may have lain dormant for decades.

Next year, lawmakers will wrestle with one of the biggest financial challenges in state history, when they have to decide how to raise the estimated $1.3 billion needed to improve water quality across Vermont.

Courtesy of Drew Price

Lauren Dunn, a first-year student at St. Michael’s College, caught a pike in Lake Champlain that might be large enough to set a world record.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR file

A Burlington-based company working on climate change solutions has won a federal grant to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions from Vermont farms. 

Mary Williams VPR Poster created by The Solidarity of Unbridled Labor

Erika Senft Miller is a dancer and choreographer who draws inspiration from specific sites and incorporates them into to her performances.

As an arts educator and steward of the land and the lake, Senft Miller has chosen to stage her latest site-specific piece at the Lake Champlain Community Sailing Center on Burlington's waterfront.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

Vermont enacted a new law this year designed to keep people safe from potential health hazards in the water, but the law isn't working as intended. And some experts say it's ultimately up to Vermonters to protect themselves from lake toxins.

Vermont Department of Health

What has this summer looked like so far in terms algae blooms and the health of Lake Champlain? We're getting an update on the latest on the lake: the science of algae blooms and the state of the state's clean-up plan. 

Kathleen Masterson / VPR File

A federal official with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says a policy change in Vermont means the agency won’t be able to use chemicals to kill parasitic sea lamprey in Lake Champlain for at least two years.

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