Media

Scott Finn took over as president of VPR in March, and says the station should stay focused on audio storytelling.
VPR

VPR's new president and CEO Scott Finn has been traveling to each of Vermont's fourteen counties to hear what Vermonters what from their public radio station. On this Vermont Edition, we take the conversation from the 'Tell Me More Tour' on the air.

A stack of newspapers on a white background.
bernie_photo / iStock

“We are not the enemy of the people." That's the message being sent out Thursday to readers of newspapers all across the country, in a coordinated effort spearheaded by the editorial staff at the Boston Globe in response to President Donald Trump's frequent attacks on the media.

The newspaper that serves the Upper Valley of Vermont and New Hampshire is cutting jobs, moving its print operation and shrinking the width of its paper.

David Moats sits in front of a microphone at VPR's Norwich studio.
Betty Smith / VPR

Earlier this week, the Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus newspapers eliminated the position of editorial editor. This ends the tenure of David Moats, who has been with the Herald since 1982. In 2001, he won a Pulitzer Prize for editorials he wrote in favor of same-sex civil unions in Vermont.

The top editor at the Daily Hampshire Gazette and Greenfield Recorder said Wednesday he was fired for speaking out in favor of higher pay for female journalists, but his record on the issue was challenged within hours.

Social media is all about engagement and participation, so the rules of an in-person conversation don't always apply.
alexsl / iStock

On Monday, the Burlington Free Press fired its executive editor, Denis Finley, following a series of Twitter comments. The episode raises questions about journalistic ethics and social media use — so what should the role of journalists be on social media?

Burlington Free Press executive editor Denis Finley says he won't apologize about comments he made about transgender issues on Twitter. Finley joined the Free Press in September 2016.
Steve Earley

The executive editor of the Burlington Free Press who set off a firestorm on Twitter last weekend "left the company Monday evening," the newspaper said on its website.

Robert Siegel spent more than 40 years working in radio news, and has reported from across the country and around the globe. Senior host of NPR's All Things Considered since 1987, he'll be stepping away from the mic in January 2018.
Stephen Voss / NPR

Robert Siegel, senior host of NPR's All Things Considered, is speaking to the Vermont Humanities Council this week, reflecting on more than four decades working in radio newsrooms. It's an apt time for reflection for the seasoned host, as he prepares to step away from the mic and retire in January 2018.

James Murdoch and his brother Lachlan, top executives at parent company News Corporation, say they’ve been trying to clean things up at Fox News.

John Dillon / VPR

A new law signed by Gov. Phil Scott Wednesday creates a legal protection for information given to journalists by confidential sources or conversations that take place “off-the-record."

WCAX-TV, Vermont’s CBS affiliate, has been sold for $29 million to a Georgia company by the family that founded the station in 1954, according a WCAX news report.

Vermont lawmakers face a number of critical decisions in 2018, related to clean water funding, property tax reform, and whether to raise the minimum wage.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Journalists in Vermont – including those at VPR News – are cheering the state Senate's passage of a so-called "shield" bill that would protect reporters from having to choose between betraying the trust of a source and potential jail time.

Candace Page headshot.
Courtesy

Vermont reporter Candace Page, who spent more than 30 years at the Burlington Free Press, was inducted into the New England Newspaper Hall of Fame in February. 

I recently sat on the edge of my seat in a packed house listening to two icons of resistance speak about the state of politics, environment and the media. Vermont’s own Bill McKibben, who jump started what’s now a global movement to fight climate change, shared the stage of Randolph’s Chandler Center for the Arts with advocacy journalist and investigative reporter Amy Goodman.

Eric Draper / AP

It all seemed so easy when you could trust your daily news sources. And for the edgier, sensationalized reports, you grabbed the supermarket tabloid. This was real, that was fake.

The Rutland Herald and   Barre-Montpelier Times Argus are in the process of being sold to two out of state partners, ending the two papers' run as the longest continuously owned family newspapers in America.

The sale was announced late Wednesday night amid a controversy over checks that bounced for newsroom staffers and the firing of a long time editor who wanted to print a follow up story about those financial troubles.

The Rutland Herald was founded in 1794 and is one of the oldest continually published papers in the country.
Nina Keck / VPR File

The Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus are being sold to new owners for an undisclosed price, according to Rob Mitchell, who serves as editor-in-chief of the paper.

The editorial staffs at a number of small-town newspapers in Vermont and Massachusetts are getting smaller still.

New England Newspapers Inc., has laid off 10 editorial employees at papers it owns including the Brattleboro Reformer, the Bennington Banner and the Manchester Journal.  The layoffs leave skeleton crews at the three Vermont newspapers.

Craven: Upbeat Oracle

Feb 23, 2015

News of David Carr’s death stunned people who believe in the importance of probing journalism in our turbulent world. Carr’s passion and precision inspired new reporters and he took great pleasure in mentoring young writers still finding their voice. One budding journalist he took under his wing was my son, Jasper.

Last October, on a whim, I emailed David Carr inviting him to speak at a Dartmouth college symposium this coming summer.

He didn’t know me from Adam, but I knew and admired his wonderful reporting and writing, his piercing and witty insights into the changing role of media in our society, his legendary mentoring of some of the best young reporters and writers in the country, and most of all, the amazing way he pulled himself up from alcohol and drug addiction to fame and glory.

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