Mental Health

Emotional abuse during childhood is linked to misuse of opioids in adulthood, according to a recent University of Vermont study.

PeopleImages / iStock

The effects of a mental illness almost always stretch beyond just one person. Being the family member of someone with a mental health condition comes with unique challenges, and providing support to a struggling loved one can be both draining and heartbreaking.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Senate lawmakers say low pay for mental health workers has led to a bottleneck in crisis care, and they’re trying to find funding to boost wages for more than 2,000 employees across the state.

vadimguzhva / iStock

Why is mental health so hard to talk about? If conditions like depression, anxiety, or even schizophrenia can have such massive impacts on people's lives, why can it feel like weakness to get help? We're continuing our week of mental health coverage by focusing in on the stigma around mental health, and how to move past it.

Copley Hospital

People who are suffering psychiatric episodes can end up in the emergency rooms of community hospitals, where doctors and nurses say they are not equipped to provide the treatment these patients need. As Vermont Edition begins a week-long exploration of mental health care in Vermont, we look at the problem of emergency psychiatric care.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

There have been no snow days for elected officials this week, and that’s probably because they have some big legislative deadlines to hit in the next few days.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Many refugees who arrive on U.S. soil finally feel safe after decades of war or torture or loss of family members. But just because they're removed from physical harm, it doesn't mean the pain is over. 

Vermont's Supreme Court ruled earlier this month that Vermonters in proceedings related to involuntary hospitalization or medication do not have the right to represent themselves in court.

A bill introduced in Montpelier Tuesday is designed to make sure emergency responders in Vermont get the help they need when the job takes a toll on their mental health.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A housing group in Brattleboro wants to purchase a motel and build a supportive housing development with 22 new apartments. Eleven of those units would be devoted to long-term housing for homeless individuals.

Seth Wenig / AP

Hoarding is a problem that can lead to serious safety and health concerns in its most extreme forms. And as hoarding becomes better understood, more people are seeking resources to intervene in the most serious cases.

chaluk / iStock.com

Vermonters have a new way of reaching help when they are having a mental health crisis: the Crisis Text Line. People can text the initials "VT" to the number 741741 and a trained crisis counselor will respond within 5 minutes.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/file

Vermont is taking a hard look at how it treats people with mental illness in its prisons.

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Vermont shows a disturbing prevalence of racial bias in mental health services.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

People experiencing a mental health crisis in Vermont don’t always have swift access to therapeutic care. And that’s a problem with no easy solution.

Wikimedia Commons

You know that feeling where your body is like a clenched fist and everything is darkness but also on fire? Welcome to the final days of election 2016. We're talking to psychologists about election anxiety, where it comes from, and what you can do about it.

The Department of Corrections will provide more mental health care to some of its inmates, under an agreement reached this week with a former prisoner.

Finding the capacity to care for acute mental health cases in Vermont has been a challenge in recent years, especially since Tropical Storm Irene shut down the state mental hospital. 

That challenge may be about to get even more difficult.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Five years after Tropical Storm Irene flooded out the state hospital in Waterbury, health care providers are still dealing with massive challenges the storm presented to the state's mental health care system.

It’s called Gay Conversion Therapy, and five states, the District of Columbia, and the city of Cincinnati already ban it from being used on children and adolescents. Anecdotal evidence ties it to teen suicide, homelessness, and substance abuse. Every major medical and psychological association in the country has flagged it as useless and brutal.

Pages