Military

Vermont Adjutant General Steven Cray, pictured here at Camp Johnson in Colchester back in 2013, joins this "Vermont Edition" to discuss key issues facing the Vermont National Guard.
KIRK CARAPEZZA / VPR FILE

The recent mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, brought into question how the military handles the reporting of domestic violence.

Maj. Gen. Steven Cray, pictured on far right at a 2013 press conference announcing the F-35 basing in Burlington, is adjutant general of the state of Vermont. Cray spoke to "Vermont Edition" about recently announced policies affecting the U.S. military.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

During the United States' longrunning conflict in Afghanistan, Vermont Guard soldiers and airmen have been deployed to the country multiple times. When President Donald Trump announced a troop increase in Afghanistan earlier this month, it came as no surprise to Maj. Gen. Steven Cray, adjutant general of the state of Vermont.

Cray spoke to Vermont Edition about how the troop increase might affect those who serve in the Vermont Guard and also discussed the president's stated objective to ban transgender people from serving in the U.S. armed forces.

A gigantic pillar of smoke with the familiar mushroom top climbs above Yucca Flat during nuclear detonation in Las Vegas, Nev., April 22, 1952.
Larry Ullom / Associated Press

"The alternatives are to dig, die or get out — and we certainly don't want to die." That assessment in 1954 by a Midwestern governor encapsulates the massive but deeply problematic redundancy planning civilian and military leaders undertook to prepare for a Soviet nuclear attack. This shadowy legacy of the Cold War is explored in the new book Raven Rock by Vermont-based journalist Garrett Graff. 

Gina Nemirofsky / Ten Times Ten LLC

You know the story of Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani girl who was almost assassinated for advocating for girls' education, and who later won a Nobel Peace Prize for efforts. But a new book by Vermont writer reminds us there are millions of Malalas in the world, and the barriers to their education are profound.

Matthew Otero / AP File

F-35 fighter jets are expected to be delivered to Vermont in 2019, but as President-elect Donald Trump mentioned in his press conference last week, there have been cost overruns and scheduling delays in the production of the fighter jet.

Patti Daniels / VPR

The Reserve Officer Training Corps, ROTC, is celebrating its 100th year. It was created by an act of Congress in 1916 when the U.S. was on the brink of joining World War I and needed well-trained officers. The idea of combining civilian college life with military officer training started at Norwich University, which lays claim to being the birthplace of ROTC.

Toby Talbot / AP

As Vermont embraces the idea of renewable energy like wind and solar, the inevitable impact on the local landscape and community is inescapable. The question then becomes, how can towns weigh in on where these projects go?

Jae C. Hong / AP/file

Ret. Col. Jon Coffin spent ten years debriefing soldiers who were returning from war zones to help identify potential cases of PTSD. He led group debriefings of soldiers while they were still intact with their platoons, after they left the combat theater but before they reunited with their families.

Wilson Ring / AP

At the end of November, the Vermont Army National Guard announced that one of its own had been awarded the specialty of combat engineer. This was notable because the specialist in question, Skylar Anderson, became the first woman in the nation to attain that distinction.

Anderson spoke with Vermont Edition about her journey, her position and her plans for the future. 

What is a combat engineer?

Anderson says her work focuses on “mobility, counter mobility, and survivability.”

There is a section of Arlington National Cemetery where soldiers who died in Afghanistan and Iraq are buried. Section 60 has taken on a unique social and cultural identity within the cemetery, partly because the people who go their to mourn are so young, like the deceased soldiers themselves.