New Hampshire

Commercial fishermen in Northern New England face their fair share of challenges. Along with declining fish stocks and tight catch regulations, the occupation also remains one of the most dangerous in the country.

With that ever-present risk in mind, dozens of fishermen turned out in New Castle, New Hampshire recently for a day-long safety training exercise.

Geert Cappelaere, the UNICEF regional director for the Middle East and North Africa, with a child suffering from cholera, on a recent trip to Yemen.
UNICEF, courtesy

Modern-day Vermonters may think of cholera as an ancient disease, but researchers at Dartmouth College are still looking for cures. And in war-torn Yemen, cholera is rampant even today. How are local labs connecting to this global issue?

Nine months ago, Joyce Chance left a refugee camp in Uganda where she had spent the last eleven years. Chance, who was born in Congo, boarded a plane with her two kids, and came to the United States.

A refugee resettlement agency in Concord, New Hampshire picked them up at the airport, and moved them into a one-room apartment.

A panel of women behind the documentary "It's Criminal" takes questions from audience members. The panel included Dartmouth professors, students, formerly incarcerated women and the filmmaker.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

At the White River Indie Festival over the weekend audiences watched the local debut of a documentary that follows a Dartmouth College class working with incarcerated women from Sullivan County, New Hampshire.

Jim Wieck, far right, a hydrogeologist and senior project manager overseeing the Rennie Farm cleanup, talks to residents about the pump and treat system at the former Dartmouth College burial site.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

The remediation system cleaning up a Hanover neighborhood’s chemically contaminated groundwater appears to be working.

The police department in Lebanon, New Hampshire, will not be making changes to its immigration policies, despite changes on the federal level.

Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont wastewater plants along the Connecticut River are waiting to hear from the Environmental Protection Agency. Even without specifics, managers at the larger plants know they will be required to adjust the amount of nitrogen in their treated wastewater, considerably lowering the levels, potentially at a high cost.

Ken Gallager / WikiCommons

At the end of May, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center will be closing a program that treats a wide range of women's reproductive hormonal and infertility issues. And that has left a lot of women in the Upper Valley angry.

Wolfeboro, a historically very red town in central New Hampshire, broke for Donald Trump in November's presidential election. But despite being a traditionally conservative town, a Democrat came out on top in a special election held this week.

Commencement ceremonies took place this weekend at UNH, after a tense few weeks at the school, with a series of racial incidents prompting  community-wide conversations about campus diversity.

This weekend’s ceremony offered a chance to reflect but also to look forward. 

A couple years ago, Manchester police lieutenant Nicole LeDoux and two colleagues decided to crunch some numbers. They found that in a single year, 400 Manchester kids had been at either domestic violence incidents or overdoses when police were called.  LeDoux is a fast talker who oversees the juvenile and domestic violence units. “I remember sitting,” she said, “and being like ‘man, that’s a lot of kids. How do we deal with that?’” 

The New Hampshire state Legislature is deciding whether to discipline one of its members for his role in setting up a misogynistic online forum.

Jared Barbosa is an Elementary School guidance counselor who was raised by a professional soccer player. His dad, Manoel “Boom Boom” Barbosa, competed all over the world before settling down in Nashua, N.H.

Jared says professional soccer was his dad’s ticket out of poverty in Brazil. College soccer was his ticket to economic mobility.

He doesn’t think high level sports should exclude low-income kids.

A Hanover couple has reached a settlement with Dartmouth College after their groundwater was contaminated by a former hazardous waste site.

Nashua’s Health Department wants you to stop using the word “addict.”

“We need to talk about substance use disorder like the disease that it is,” health educator Aly McKnight told a captive audience of thirty or so in the basement of Nashua Public Library last month.  She pointed to a list of “stigmatizing” words projected onto a screen. “Alcoholic,” “junkie,” even “addiction” should be avoided, it said. 

Rebecca Sananes / VPR

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen has been speaking out about the importance of the Northern Border Regional Commission.

A large parcel of land is being added to the Appalachian Trail in Hanover.

Refugee resettlement agencies receive funding based on the number of people they anticipate resettling, so the uncertainty around President Trump’s travel ban has serious fiscal consequences.

Jeff Thielman is the CEO of the International Institute of New England, a resettlement agency working in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. His agency expects eight refugees to arrive by March 28.

The number of people detained in New Hampshire by federal immigration authorities since Donald Trump took office was greater than the number detained any of the previous six months. 

Monday is the vernal equinox: that’s the beginning of spring, according to astronomers. For ecologists, spring isn’t just a matter of the earth’s rotation around the sun.  

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