Nuclear Regulatory Commission

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has rejected the state's request to take a closer look at Entergy Vermont Yankee's decommissioning trust fund.

The state of Vermont has won a round in its challenge to how Entergy Vermont Yankee plans to spend its decommissioning funds.

Toby Talbot / AP

The state of Vermont and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission don't always see eye to eye. The state and the feds disagreed over the future of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant when the Vernon reactor was operating. And now that the plant is shut down, the state has challenged the federal agency over emergency planning and decommissioning.

Jason R. Henske / AP/File

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is questioning Entergy Vermont Yankee’s claims that the risk of accidents is negligible after the plant stops operating. 

Entergy Vermont Yankee applied to the NRC in March for permission to scale back emergency planning once its fuel is moved from the reactor core to the spent fuel pool. That includes eliminating or drastically reducing emergency planning zones in towns surrounding the facility.

A federal inspection of flood prevention measures at the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant has found several deficiencies but none requiring enforcement action.

A team from Nuclear Regulatory Commission arrived at the reactor last July to conduct the on-site audit. The NRC required the inspections after an earthquake and tsunami crippled several reactors in Japan in 2011.

NRC spokesman Neil Sheehan said the team did identify some problems with Yankee's record-keeping and flood-assessment calculations. He said the observations were similar to what NRC teams found at other 

The federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission has all but ceased operations as their funds dried up today, forcing the government safety regulator to furlough more than 90 percent of its employees.

In a statement, spokesman Neil Sheehan said the NRC website, including information portals that allow the public to see the status of all nuclear power plants, will be “static after tonight.”

Among the 300 remaining at work are the resident inspectors assigned to each nuclear power plant across the U.S.