Peter Shumlin

Some AT&T cellphone customers in Putney could see their service restored after it was inadvertently cut during an upgrade in the southeastern Vermont community.

Gov. Peter Shumlin, who lives in Putney, says AT&T told him the Putney service for some customers was lost when the company ended a roaming agreement with Verizon for 2G service because it had completed work on its own towers that offered 3G and 4G capacity.

The Brattleboro Reformer reports the switchover caused some 2G customers to lose service on April 19.

Gov. Peter Shumlin is going to be picking up trash along Interstate 89 in Middlesex to promote Green Up Day.

Saturday marks the annual Green Up Day, in which people across the state help pick up roadside litter that has accumulated over the year.

Shumlin will join Agency of Transportation workers on Friday as they pick up trash on Interstate 89 south.

Green Up Day has been a Vermont tradition since 1970.

Each town organizes its own Green Up activities.

Gov. Peter Shumlin is sticking to his guns in the face of inaction in Washington to address gun violence, saying Vermont needs no changes in its firearms laws.

Shumlin reiterated earlier comments that Vermont does not need background checks for gun buyers, limits on assault weapons or the sizes of ammunition clips. He earlier had said those issues should be addressed on a national basis by Congress.

AP/Toby Talbot

Governor Peter Shumlin is not backing down from his position on gun control, even as momentum in Washington for universal background checks seems to have run out of steam.

Shumlin continues to call for a 50-state solution.

Last week, the U.S. Senate defeated the Obama administration’s gun-control proposals.

House lawmakers continue to consider a bill that would require the labeling of genetically engineered foods sold at stores in Vermont, and co-ops and student groups gathered at the Statehouse in Montpelier today to show their support for the measure. But it appears the bill is unlikely to pass this session.

Shumlin, Lawmakers Split On EITC Proposal

Apr 16, 2013

A new report analyzing Governor Peter Shumlin’s plan to take money from a low-income tax credit program to finance an expansion of child care services has set off a fierce debate over this issue.  And both sides are using a different set of facts to make their case.

Is Vermont’s low-income tax credit program one of the most generous in the country or do benefits from the program lag far behind most other states?   Those are some of the questions raised in a new report issued by the Public Assets Institute.

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