Peter Welch

Lauren Victoria Burke / AP

Vermont Congressman Peter Welch has re-introduced legislation that would reveal intelligence spending that's currently classified. Meanwhile, the USA Freedom Act - another bill co-sponsored by Rep. Welch, that would rein in the government's bulk collection of personal data - passed in the House.

FILE - Rep. Pete Welch, D-Vt., speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Welch won both the Democratic and Republican nominations in August 2016 for re-election that year to a sixth term.
Lauren Victoria Burke / AP

The U.S. House has voted to repeal the federal estate tax. Congressman Peter Welch strongly opposed the plan because he says it will add $270 billion to the national deficit and benefit very few people.

Vahid Salemi / AP

Congressman Peter Welch says he's encouraged by a tentative agreement concerning the future of Iran's nuclear program.

Under the agreement reached between the United States and several other world powers, Iran would accept restrictions on its nuclear program for a decade, and in return, international sanctions would be gradually lifted.

iunewind / iStock

Congressman Peter Welch is sponsoring legislation to protect the personal information of consumers from electronic data breaches in the future. Welch says he's concerned because cyber criminals are stealing this data at an alarming rate.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

Members of Vermont’s congressional delegation are pressing their colleagues to prevent a shutdown of the Department of Homeland Security this week.

The department’s funding will stop at the end of the day Friday if no resolution is reached, but Republican leaders in the House and the Senate have so far not allowed a vote on a “clean” budget bill.

The budget itself is not the point of contention, said Rep. Peter Welch.

Ramon Espinosa / AP

Congressman Peter Welch is sponsoring legislation to lift the travel ban with Cuba. Welch says he's convinced that normalizing diplomatic relations with Cuba will help create opportunities for democracy in that country.

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Congressman Peter Welch says he'll support a 12-cent increase in the federal gasoline tax as a way to provide long-term stability for the nation's Highway Trust Fund, which will run out of money by the middle of May if Congress doesn't act.

Welch says he’ll oppose any short-term solutions to this issue. If the Highway Trust Fund runs dry, thousands of road and bridge projects across the country and dozens in Vermont will be severely cut back.

Angela Evancie / VPR

Net neutrality and equitable access to high-speed internet is a priority for many business leaders, and it's an issue that the House Energy and Commerce Committee will be weighing in on as the FCC considers new rules on net neutrality. Friday on Vermont Edition, we talk with Representative Peter Welch, a member of that congressional committee, about net neutrality and the impact on Vermont entrepreneurs.  We also look at raising the federal gas tax, Welch's opposition to the Keystone XL Pipeline, and his recent trip to Cuba as diplomatic relations with that country open up.

Two years ago, Congressman Peter Welch visited Cuba as part of a special congressional fact-finding mission.

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

The U.S. House has given its approval to legislation that funds the federal government for the next nine months.

Congressman Peter Welch has voted against a $1.1 trillion budget bill that would fund the federal government for the rest of the fiscal year.

Audio for this story will be posted at approximately 11 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 12.

Congressman Peter Welch has voted against the extension of a package of tax credits for businesses and individuals. The $45 billion plan passed the House late yesterday. The vote was 370 to 46.

The legislation will allow dozens of credits to be used during the 2014 tax year. It includes deductions for NASCAR race track owners, college students, commuters, and some teachers. It also extends research and development tax credits for many businesses.

Angela Evancie / VPR

When Congress returns to Washington next month for the second phase of its lame duck session, Rep. Peter Welch will be urging House leaders to schedule a comprehensive debate to consider President Obama's plan to increase military actions against the terrorist group ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

Jim Bourg / Reuters Pool/AP

All three members of Vermont's congressional delegation strongly support President Obama's new immigration reform plan. The delegation says the president had to act because the U.S. House failed to move an immigration bill. 

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Congressman Peter Welch has voted against legislation that would authorize the construction of the Keystone XL Pipeline.

The Keystone pipeline issue came before the U.S. House on Friday and was approved by a vote of 252 to 161.

The State Department is currently reviewing this proposal because it would bring oil sands from Canada to refineries in the southern part of the United States.

President Obama is expected to announce his position on the proposed pipeline in the next few weeks.

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Congressman Peter Welch is our guest on the next Vermont Edition. The Democrat was easily re-elected last week, but when the new Congress begins work in January he will have fewer Democratic colleagues and a host of issues still to decide, including immigration and the future of the Affordable Care Act.

Send your questions for Congressman Peter Welch to vermontedition@vpr.net or post below.

Broadcast live on Fri., Nov. 14 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Democrat Peter Welch has easily won a fifth term as Vermont's lone representative in the U.S. House, turning aside the second challenge in as many elections from Republican Mark Donka.

In 2012, Welch beat Donka,  a conservative Republican and Woodstock police officer, by amore than three-to-one margin.

As Republicans increased their ranks in Washington Tuesday night, Welch said the big challenge facing Congress would continue to be in finding common ground.

The Ebola virus has infected very few people in the United States, and none here in Vermont. But political debate about the disease has spread to the state’s congressional race. 

Incumbent Democrat Peter Welch and his Republican opponent Mark Donka have very different opinions about whether a travel ban is the best way to fight Ebola. 

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Congressman Peter Welch says it would be a mistake to implement a travel ban from West Africa as a way to contain the spread of the Ebola virus in the United States.

Welch says the best public health strategy right now is to deploy  U.S. troops in Africa as part of an effort to contain this deadly disease at its source.

The response by the White House to the spread of the Ebola virus in this country has come under the close scrutiny of Congress.

Jane Lindholm / VPR File

Rep. Peter Welch has introduced legislation that he says will make it easier for Vermont’s community banks to offer mortgages and loans.

The legislation would exempt many smaller banks from the financial regulations that were put into place following the national financial crisis in 2008.

Welch says it’s very important for Congress to realize that there’s a big difference between the operations of large Wall Street banks and the work done by community based banks across the country.

The U.S. House has given its approval to President Obama’s plan to arm and train Syrian forces to fight against the terrorist group known as ISIS –the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

Congressman Peter Welch voted against the plan because he says it has virtually no chance of succeeding and will put the U.S. in the middle of a Syrian civil war.

Welch says this vote was one of the most difficult that he’s had to make in the eight years he’s served in the U.S. House.

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