PFOA

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Recent test results showing almost a dozen new residences in Bennington with PFOA levels above the health standard prove that the chemical is still moving through the environment. The state is struggling to understand just how long it will be before any homeowner within the area of contamination can be assured that their water is safe.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Public health advocates say the discovery of a toxic chemical in private drinking wells in southern Vermont last year exposes shortcomings in state regulatory oversight. But an effort to bolster consumer protections fell short in the Legislature this year.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Bennington residents who have been dealing with contaminated water are starting to get frustrated with the state's ability to find a long-term solution to their problem.

A lawyer involved with a class-action suit in Bennington says a $671 million settlement by the company that made PFOA highlights the dangers of the chemical.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As part of its most recent lawsuit against the State of Vermont, Saint-Gobain sent out sheriff's deputies to serve court papers to 17 people who live near the company's former factory.

Michel Euler / AP

Saint-Gobain, the company that owned the North Bennington factory that's suspected of polluting water in the area, has stepped up its legal battle against the state of Vermont.

Jtasphoto / iStock

After the industrial chemical PFOA contaminated the drinking water of hundreds of people in southern Vermont, legislators wanted to avoid another surprise contamination. So last year, they tasked a working group to figure out how the state could more proactively regulate chemicals. Now the group is back with recommendations.

A national study has found that a chemical related to the one that's polluted water in Bennington is still being used in fast food wrappers.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont's Health Commissioner says people in Bennington who consumed water with the industrial chemical PFOA have detectable levels of the chemical in their bodies.

Clockwise from top left: Lisa Rathke, AP; Andy Duback, AP; Nina Keck, VPR; Jacquelyn Martin, AP; Angela Evancie, VPR.

It's been quite a year. In the final days of 2016, we're reflecting on some of the biggest news stories of the year and looking toward what's next in 2017.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The president of Saint-Gobain says his company might not be responsible for the water contamination in Bennington County.

Governor-elect Phil Scott says he'll continue the work of the outgoing Shumlin administration to reach a settlement with the company that contaminated drinking water in Bennington County.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR file

A legislative committee has permanently set Vermont's safe drinking water standard for the chemicals PFOA and PFOS at 20 parts per trillion.

The Department of Environmental Conservation has uncovered new sources of PFOA and PFOS, two hazardous chemicals that were used in manufacturing.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Talks with the company that contaminated more than 250 private wells in Bennington have broken down. And state officials say they're ready to introduce legislation in Montpelier to address the water crisis in southwestern Vermont.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The state now says it will pay for the engineering plans to extend municipal waterlines to homes in Bennington contaminated with PFOA.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A state geologist is gathering data to help build a 3-D map of the ground underneath Bennington to try understand how the chemical PFOA may be moving through groundwater.

In the last couple years, millions of people across the country have learned their drinking water contains high levels of the contaminants known as perfluorichemicals. These are used to make nonstick things like Teflon and pizza boxes.  And for those with illnesses that are linked to the contaminant, that knowledge can be helpful -- and frustrating.

A Washington Superior Court Judge has thrown out a law suit that challenged the state's interim safety standard for the chemical PFOA.

Cumberland, Rhode Island popped up on a list of cities and towns that have unsafe levels of the chemical perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA. It’s used to make Teflon. It turns out those levels have dropped significantly in the town over the past year.

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