Phil Scott

Jordan Verasamy, 14, of Essex, joined students from across Vermont at a press conference in Montpelier Thursday to call on lawmakers to pass legislation that would require background checks for private gun sales.
Jeb Wallace-Brodeur / The Times Argus

For decades gun control has been the third rail of Vermont politics — but almost overnight that appears to have changed — and recent events in Vermont and beyond have put gun legislation on a fast track in Montpelier.

Allegations of racial harassment at the Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital made news last week. But records show the state has fielded dozens of complaints of race-based harassment and discrimination at agencies across state government.
Jane Lindholm / VPR File

While allegations of racial harassment at the Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital in Berlin made news last week, records show that they were hardly isolated incidents: The state regularly fields complaints of race-based harassment and discrimination at agencies across state government.

House Speaker Mitzi Johnson says passage of a property tax reform package is a top priority for this session
Angela Evancie / VPR file

A proposal is being developed representing the first major change to education financing in Vermont in over a decade, and House Speaker Mitzi Johnson says she's committed to making it a reality.

Allegations of racial harassment at the Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital made news last week. But records show the state has fielded dozens of complaints of race-based harassment and discrimination at agencies across state government.
Jane Lindholm / VPR File

After allegations of racial harassment at the Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital in Berlin, Gov. Phil Scott says his administration is reviewing workplace conditions at the state-run facility.

A sign posted at Vermont Public Radio showcases the rise in state minimum wage over recent years. The photo has a filter out areas of the document while leaving other parts in focus.
Photo: Emily Alfin Johnson; Photo Illustration: Meg Malone / VPR

A key Vermont Senate committee has given its approval to legislation increasing the state minimum wage to $15 an hour over a 6-year period. 

Commissioner of Taxes Kaj Samsom, Secretary of Administration Susanne Young and Commissioner of Finance Adam Greshin, from left, walk reporters through a proposed tax overhaul that they say will avoid a $30 million tax hike on Vermonters this year.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

The administration of Gov. Phil Scott unveiled a proposed income tax overhaul Friday that it says will protect middle-class Vermonters from an otherwise significant tax hike in 2018.

Natural Resources Secretary Julie Moore and Gov. Phil Scott outline Vermont's phosphorus innovation challenge geared at reducing nutrient pollution in Lake Champlain.
John Dillon / VPR

Phosphorus is a basic building block of life. It’s in our bones, and it helps plants grow. But too much of this good thing is bad for places like Lake Champlain, where the nutrient fuels toxic algae blooms.

provided by Christine Hallquist

A longtime Vermont utility executive says she’s strongly considering running for governor as a Democrat.

Christine Hallquist, the CEO of the Vermont Electric Cooperative, says she’s been contemplating a bid to unseat Republican Gov. Phil Scott for months. But she says her experience at the women’s march in Montpelier earlier this month pushed her closer to a decision.

Gov. Phil Scott has suggested capturing and selling phosphorus before it gets to the state's waterways and lakes.
VPR File

In his budget address on Tuesday, Gov. Phil Scott suggested Vermont should turn lemons into lemonade by capturing the phosphorous flowing into our waterways - and selling it.

Would that work? We’re talking about whether the suggestion is feasible, how phosphorus could be separated out and what the economics of the idea might look like.

Gov. Scott delivered his 2018 budget address before a joint session of the Vermont Legislature.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Calling for consensus to avoid a property tax increase, Gov. Phil Scott's budget address outlined his spending priorities and principles for the coming year.

Vermont Edition digs into the details of just what the governor is proposing with his new budget, and how the math works out to pay for it without raising taxes or fees.

House Speaker Mitzi Johnson and Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe, center, flanked by Democratic colleagues in the Legislature, say they have concerns with Gov. Phil Scott's approach to the issue of cost-containment in public schools.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

With an executive branch in Republican hands, and a Legislature overwhelmingly controlled by Democrats, ideological conflict is part and parcel of state government these days. And it became clear Tuesday afternoon where that partisan divide is widest.

Secretary of Administration Susanne Young and Commissioner of Finance Adam Greshin told reporters Tuesday that the governor's fiscal year 2019 budget plan ties rate of growth in state spending to the increase in Vermonters' wages.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

In a budget proposal that one administration official describes as having “no bells … and no whistles,” Republican Gov. Phil Scott is calling for a $5.9 billion spending plan that pegs the rate of growth in the budget to the increase in Vermonters’ incomes in recent years.

Golden dome of the Vermont Statehouse on a cloudy day.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Gov. Phil Scott delivered his 2018 budget address Tuesday afternoon at the Vermont Statehouse.

Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe strongly supports raising Vermont's minimum wage to $15 an hour over a period of years.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

The Vermont Senate could vote in the next few weeks on a bill that raises the state minimum wage from the current $10.50 an hour to $15 an hour over a period of several years. 

The legislation is a top priority for Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe, but the plan is opposed by Gov. Phil Scott.

Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce CEO and President Tom Torti, at the podium, joined environmental and municipal leaders last week to call for a per-parcel fee, on every property owner in Vermont, to fund clean water projects.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Environmental advocates aren’t the only voices pressuring Montpelier to come up with a long-term funding mechanism for water quality projects. Members of the state's business community are also joining the call.

Despite pressure from opponents to veto the legislation, Gov. Phil Scott has signed into law a bill that will legalize possession of small amounts of marijuana.
VPR / Bob Kinzel

Vermont has become the first state in the nation to legalize marijuana through an act of the Legislature.

Gov. Phil Scott says lawmakers should consider mandatory reductions in school staff, as well as reforms to the education funding system, to avoid an increase in the statewide property tax rate next year.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

A mandatory reduction in staff at public schools across Vermont is among the list of “ideas” that Gov. Phil Scott is asking lawmakers to consider as his administration looks to stave off a projected increase in next year’s statewide property tax rate.

Vermont Secretary of Human Services Al Gobeille, pictured here in Sept. 2017
Bob Kinzel / VPR File

This week, the Trump administration authorized states to require some people to work in order to be eligible for Medicaid benefits. But Vermont Secretary of Human Services Al Gobeille says the Scott administration has no immediate plans to institute the employment mandate.

Sarah Evans, who formerly managed a safe injection site in Vancouver, told lawmakers that the facilities are associated with a reduction in overdoses, and an increase in addicts seeking treatment.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

The rising toll of opioid addiction has policymakers looking for new ways to save lives, and Vermont lawmakers are giving serious consideration to a bill that would open the door to supervised drug injection sites.

Sen. Joe Benning (R- Caledonia, left), Sen. Francis Brooks (D-Washington, middle), and Sen. Ann Cummings (D-Washington) peruse a list of bills before the Senate on the first day of the 2018 Legislative session.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Lawmakers began the 2018 legislative session by putting landmark votes like legalizing marijuana at the top of their docket. Gov. Phil Scott outlined his own goals for the new year in his Thursday State of the State address.

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