Race & Identity

I’ve done a little time traveling, courtesy of The New York Times. The paper recently crunched age and diversity data from the US Census Bureau, combined the result with population projections, and compared 3,000 counties with the country as a whole, over time.

June is pride month for the LGBTQ community and the White River Junction Veterans Affairs Medical Center says veterans are no exception.

Vermont Law School, Courtesy

Brittmy Martinez, a rising second-year student at Vermont Law School, is one of three VLS students recently named to the National Black Law Students Association's executive board. She is the chief of staff of NBLSA. 

Title IX has been a federal law since 1972. We look at what progress women have made on campus and in business because of the law.
Stockce / iStock

On June 23, 1972, Title IX went into effect, mandating the equal treatment of all students, regardless of gender, in education programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. So how much have education and professional opportunities for women improved in that time?

The Muslim holy month of Ramadan comes to a close this weekend. The final days of the holiday are meant to be a sacred culmination of weeks of prayer and daily fasting from sunrise to sunset.

But in the wake of recent violent acts against Muslims, many in the Boston-area Islamic community are coming together not only to pray, but also to seek comfort and safety.

South Burlington High School and Milton Middle School have both had rocky conversations about race and inclusion during this school year.
BeholdingEye / iStock

A few recent highly publicized racial incidents at schools have left some Vermonters unsettled, but minority communities say racial bias in schools is an everyday experience, not an outlier. Vermont Edition looks at what Vermont schools should do to address racism.

Eva Mondon, in foreground, listens to a recording she made about the Andrew's Inn at an exhibit at Next Stage Arts in Putney. A portrait of Mondon hangs on the wall.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Andrew's Inn, a gay bar in Bellows Falls that was open from 1973 through 1984, is the subject of a new oral history project that features the voices and stories of people who worked at and went to the club.

Abel Luna leads protestors in a chant outside the Chittenden Regional Correctional Facility where one of the dairy workers is being held.
Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Activists gathered outside the Chittenden Regional Correctional Facility Monday morning to protest the arrest of two Vermont dairy farmworkers originally from Mexico.

Maria Twitty (left) and Omega Jade spoke about racism in Milton schools on public access television with Black Lives Matter VT organizer Ebony Nyoni (center). Twitty said her daughter Mikhayla, right, was suspended for reporting a racist slur.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

A Milton mother says her daughter was suspended from school after another student addressed her daughter using a racial slur, and now organizers with Black Lives Matter are calling for Milton Superintendent Ann Bradshaw to resign.

Officials in Vermont say that their policing policies don't violate federal law. The Justice Department sent letters this week to the state of Vermont and Burlington saying that some of their policies could lead to a loss of federal grants.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

Burlington’s city council approved a new Fair and Impartial Policing Policy Monday, completing a process that began just after Donald Trump was elected president.

Students from Lynda Siegel's ESL class are learning water safety through a free course at the Greater Burlington YMCA.
Doug Bishop/Greater Burlington YMCA, courtesy

For many Vermonters, swimming is learned early and central to summer fun. But for children who are new to the United States and still learning English, swimming can be a completely foreign concept.

Patients and staff at the Vermont State Hospital in Waterbury around 1900.
Courtesy, Vermont State Archives

Vermont's prominent role in the American eugenics movement of the early 20th century is an often overlooked part of the state’s history.  The state's brutal history of sterilization, forced institutionalization, and racist pseudoscience is the focus of a new academic paper by our guest.

Poutine is a dish of French fries, cheese curds and gravy.  The dish's modern perception as a Canadian dish, rather than Quebecois dish, is the subject of a recently published paper by UVM graduate student Nicolas Fabien-Ouellet.
juliedeshaies / iStockphoto.com

Poutine originated in Quebec, but over time has come to be seen by many as a Canadian dish. One University of Vermont student is now making the case that this modern association of poutine with Canada at large is an instance of cultural appropriation.

In the early 20th century, Vermont was among a group of states that had policies on the books based on eugenics — the idea that the human population could be controlled to bring out what were considered "desirable" characteristics.

Gov. Phil Scott says he's troubled by President Trump's comments about the violence in Charlottesville last weekend
Bob Kinzel / VPR file

Advocates for criminal justice reform hope a new law will curb racial disparities in police stops and incarceration rates.

This past weekend we celebrated Memorial Day to honor fallen servicemen and women. I myself am daughter of a decorated Vietnam veteran, and while I don’t attend parades, I do pause and reflect on the price our service members pay to preserve our freedoms.

Nina Keck / VPR

At Rutland's Mount St. Joseph Academy, school officials have been working hard to grow and diversify enrollment. And despite some bumps along the way, their efforts seem to be paying off.

Susan Hartman at the VPR Studios in Colchester
Meg Malone / VPR

One of the state's leading advocacy organizations for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community has new leadership: Susan Hartman is executive director of the Pride Center of Vermont as of May 1.

Reports of anti-Semitic incidents in the U.S. are up 86 percent so far this year, according to a study released by the Anti-Defamation League. And with that increase comes a new wave of interest in a decades-old German law reinstating German citizenship to Holocaust refugees and their descendants.

Lindsay Raymondjack Photography / Courtesy Vermont Stage

Adoption is emotional process that's even more layered when parents adopt a child from another culture. The family's attention to race, privilege, language and cultural expectations will be forever changed. Those are some of the themes of a current production by Vermont Stage.

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