Race & Identity

Given the debate about acceptance and tolerance, religious and otherwise, I’ve been reminded of how the Nazis required Jews to wear yellow stars on their clothing as emblems of their identity. And I’ve briefly imagined wearing a yellow star of my own, made with the Islamic image of a star and crescent moon embroidered in the center instead of Juden, the German word for Jew.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Sunday Mass is no longer held at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception at Pine and Cherry streets, but once a month a Vietnamese priest comes down from Montreal to perform Mass in Vietnamese for the local community.

Vladone / iStockphoto.com

Quebec's far-right groups may not have played a direct role in a mosque shooting late last month, but some worry that extremist language is heating up and may be pushing some people to action.

They came to Vermont in the thousands and tens of thousands, in cold weather and hot. Not speaking the language, often relegated to the hardest and most difficult work, they were treated as second class citizens.

At the time, one Vermont scholar wrote that they were “an abominable crew of vagabonds, robust, lazy men and boys, slatternly women with litters of filthy brats….The character of these people is not such to as to inspire the highest hope for the future of Vermont,” he concluded, “if they should become the most numerous of its population.”

Courtesy, American Public Media

When the National Museum of African American History and Culture opened, The Washington Post asked people to submit objects that made up their own lived experiences of black history. These objects were then used to curate a "people's museum" of personal artifacts, family photos and more.

A shooting at a mosque in Quebec City on Sunday left six dead and 19 wounded. Police arrested one suspect who has been charged with six counts of first-degree murder and five counts of attempted murder.

Nina Keck / VPR

In the U.S., protests, confusion and anger have followed President Trump’s executive order that prevents new refugees from entering the country for 120 days, suspends resettlement for Syrians indefinitely and bars travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries for 90 days.

Taylor Dobbs / Vermont Public Radio

After legal advocates and citizen activists showed strong opposition over the weekend to President Trump's executive orders on immigration and refugees, Vermont's elected officials got to work Monday morning outlining actions they plan to take.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

While Gov. Phil Scott and other elected officeholders in Vermont have had harsh words for the federal executive orders that could restrict immigration to the United States, some legal advocates are calling for more concrete actions to protect immigrants living in the state.

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

This week, the Burlington Police Department released data showing how officers used force for the last six years. The department's analysis showed that overall use of force is going down, but the data also showed some cases of racial disparity.

In the recent sour exchange between President Trump and U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, the President actually said that Lewis was “all talk and no action.” And I had to laugh because the life of John Lewis has been all about action.

Amy Noyes / VPR

Saturday's Women's Marches on Montpelier and on Washington, D.C. drew crowds that surpassed expectations. An estimated 15,000 protesters descended on Vermont's Statehouse alone.

Neustockimages / iStock.com

The general assumption has been that the higher the student loan debt, the more likely for a young adult to "boomerang" back to their parents' house. According to a recent study though, it's a more complicated than that.

I recently visited the Civil Rights Museum in Tennessee. Standing on the site where Dr. King was assassinated, I found it strange to think of his legacy as belonging in a 'museum.’ We still face intense injustice and erosion of liberties in this New Year of 2017. And it remains a challenge to avoid letting insecurity and ignorance calcify our spirit. A case in point is the controversy over Mayor Chris Louras’ plan to resettle 100 Syrian refugees in Rutland.

Attorney General TJ Donovan says a lawsuit filed against the state of Vermont, for its alleged role in EB-5 frauds in the Northeast Kingdom, is without merit.
Oliver Parini / VPR file

Vermont’s first new attorney general since 1997, TJ Dovovan, was sworn into office last week.

Patti Daniels / VPR

A new University of Vermont study shows disparities in how police officers around the state treat drivers of different races. 

Patti Daniels / VPR

On Monday morning, new data was released on police traffic stops from more than two dozen local police departments in Vermont. The researchers who compiled the data say black and Hispanic drivers are significantly more likely to be stopped by police in Vermont than white drivers.

Courtesy, John Mejia

A Monkton resident who has had multiple Black Lives Matter signs stolen from his front yard is appealing to the community for support. 

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Rescuers: Portraits of Moral Courage in the Holocaust

A one-time Vermont resident who was honored for her work saving the lives of Jews during World War II has died. 

Ryan Caron King / NENC

In 2014, the Obama administration issued a federal memo aiming to put an end to random deportations of people living illegally in the U.S. who aren't criminals. But a closer look finds that there are still cases where immigration authorities are ignoring these policies, including in Vermont.

Pages