Race & Identity

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Political leaders in Burlington are speaking out against the anti-Semitic rhetoric used in a flyer passed out at Monday evening's city council meeting.

New England is an old region, and not just by historical standards.

The population here is aging faster than almost any other place in the country. Fewer people are having children, and many of the states struggle to keep younger generations living and working here.

And as New England's baby boomers grow older, and live longer, the need for health care workers also grows.

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Efforts to gather race-related traffic stop data from Vermont law enforcement are taking more time than lawmakers envisioned.

Binary computer language is often used to describe people. One is either man or woman, black or white, gay or straight, Democrat or Republican, American or un-American, us or them. It’s simple. Right?

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Activist groups focused on racial justice, climate change, reproductive rights and economic issues are trying to turn the election of Donald Trump into a unifying moment for their various movements.

Melody Bodette / VPR

Local clergy in Middlebury have planned a Community Gathering of Love and Hope on Saturday in response to vandalism at the county's Jewish congregation, as well as other incidents across the nation.

Evan Vucci / AP

Many communities are concerned that the Trump administration could have a negative impact on their lives. Among them are people who identify as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer, people whose rights have only recently been codified.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

A new historic marker has gone up in Fort Ethan Allen in Colchester to commemorate the Buffalo Soldiers, an African-American U.S. Army regiment that served there from 1909 to 1913.

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Vermont shows a disturbing prevalence of racial bias in mental health services.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR/file

Burlington mayor Miro Weinberger says he wants to make the city a so-called "sanctuary city" for people who are in the United States illegally. That's even though Republican president-elect Donald Trump has vowed to strip all federal funding from cities that have policies to shelter or protect illegal immigrants from deportation.

Craig Dingle / iStock.com

A lot of us have been in conversations lately about what it's like to be a woman in this particular political and cultural moment. On the next Vermont Edition, we're moving that conversation into the studio.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Dozens of University of Vermont students and members of the Burlington community convened outside the Davis Student Center Tuesday afternoon to protest in response to the election of Donald Trump as president, but demonstrators spoke out on a variety of issues.

Rob Strong / Dartmouth College

This week, at the Hopkins Center for the Arts in Hanover, the play Intimate Apparel is being performed by Dartmouth students. The play is set in 1905 but director Tazewell Thompson says the themes are reflective of our time.

This week, the University of Vermont’s student newspaper, the Vermont Cynic, won the Associated Collegiate Press’ 2016 Diversity Story of the Year award for a look back at the history of race at the university.

The United States Supreme Court has begun its new term. And, in just a few weeks, they’ve heard arguments in three different cases involving racial bias in the criminal justice system.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Attorney General Bill Sorrell has put together a working group to look at how Vermonters have been affected by unconscious bias while dealing with the police.

Rights and Democracy Vermont

The Vermont Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union is calling on the Vermont Supreme Court to overturn the conviction of a man who posted Ku Klux Klan flyers on the homes of two women of color in Burlington.

Screenshot of the post on the Hartford Police Department's Facebook page

Last Tuesday, the Hartford Police Department posted a picture on their Facebook page that shows graffiti on the Dothan Brook Elementary School. It reads “AMERICAK.K.K.ANS FOR TRUMP," referencing the Ku Klux Klan.

Courtesy of Henry Holt and Company

As the United States was fighting furiously to throw off the shackles of British oppression in the late 1700s, nearly a million people were enslaved in American colonies. That number would reach around four million by the 1860 census. So how did Washington, Jefferson and some of the other founding fathers justify the nation's freedom from England while denying it to enslaved people?

On Tuesday morning, a staffer at the Vermont Democratic Party Field office in Bennington discovered someone had left several racist and anti-Semitic pictures in mail for the office.

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