Refugee Resettlement

Nina Keck / VPR

In the U.S., protests, confusion and anger have followed President Trump’s executive order that prevents new refugees from entering the country for 120 days, suspends resettlement for Syrians indefinitely and bars travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries for 90 days.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

While Gov. Phil Scott and other elected officeholders in Vermont have had harsh words for the federal executive orders that could restrict immigration to the United States, some legal advocates are calling for more concrete actions to protect immigrants living in the state.

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A nonprofit law firm in Burlington is offering free legal advice to people from the “countries of concern” listed in the executive order President Donald Trump signed late Friday.

Vermont officials are responding to two executive orders signed by President Donald Trump this week on immigration, including the withholding of federal funding for cities and towns designated as sanctuary cities. 

Nina Keck / VPR

Last week the first two Syrian families arrived in Rutland. If, as expected, President Trump scales back or halts U.S. refugee resettlement policy, those families may be the last Syrians to arrive.

Ryan Caron King / NENC

Rutland City Mayor Christopher Louras says an executive order expected from President Donald Trump later this week would quash plans to resettle 100 Syrian refugees in the city.  

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan, pictured here in Montpelier in January, has joined a lawsuit aimed at preventing President Donald Trump from rescinding DACA. We're talking to him about that decision.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

As questions swirl about the fate of immigration policy in the United States, Attorney General TJ Donovan is launching a task force to explore whether Vermont can blunt the impact of executive orders signed by President Donald Trump.

Sam McNeil / AP

Rutland has been at the center of a national discussion about refugee resettlement for months now. Now, the first Syrian refugees have arrived. We're talking about Rutland in the national context, and about the situation in Syria that's brought us to this point. 

Nina Keck / VPR

More details about the Syrian families who arrived in Rutland this week, one day apart, are beginning to emerge. Rutland Mayor Christopher Louras says he met both families.

Nina Keck / VPR

A turbulent, war torn journey that’s spanned several years and thousands of miles ended Wednesday in Vermont for one Syrian refugee family. A second family is due to arrive Thursday.

Raad Adayleh / AP

Refugee families from Syria, the first of about a hundred individuals who might be resettled in Rutland in the coming year, have begun to arrive. But millions of other displaced Syrians remain behind while they await security approval to be resettled in another country.

Nina Keck / VPR

School officials in Rutland say they’re ready for the arrival of refugee families later this month. But the Rutland County Parent Child Center, which works with younger children and babies, say it's not ready — and it blames a lack of resources.

Clockwise from top left: Lisa Rathke, AP; Andy Duback, AP; Nina Keck, VPR; Jacquelyn Martin, AP; Angela Evancie, VPR.

It's been quite a year. In the final days of 2016, we're reflecting on some of the biggest news stories of the year and looking toward what's next in 2017.

Ryan Caron King / NENC

Next month, a mix of Syrian and Iraqi refugees will begin arriving in Rutland, Vermont. They’ll be the first of 100 that will be resettled there over the next year. Though there's been loud opposition to the plan in the aging, blue-collar city of 16,000, proponents remain optimistic — and many have been volunteering long hours to ensure the plan succeeds.

Nina Keck / VPR

The Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program oversees hundreds of volunteers in Chittenden County. And now, with a new office opening in Rutland, the organization is recruiting new volunteers.

An acre-and-a-half block is available in downtown Rutland, and that got us thinking: What would people in the area like to see fill the space?
Nina Keck / VPR file

As Rutland prepares to welcome Syrian refugees to its community, some are continuing to voice concerns that there aren’t enough jobs for refugees in the city, or that local residents will lose work — but many local employers disagree.

Nina Keck / VPR file

With Donald Trump headed for the White House, there's a looming question about how his administration will affect the United States' refugee policy — and what the future holds for Rutland's plans to begin taking in Syrian refugees this year.

Refugees from around the world continue to find homes in Massachusetts. The number of Syrian refugees, in particular, has more than doubled here over the last year, despite heated national rhetoric around immigration.

An acre-and-a-half block is available in downtown Rutland, and that got us thinking: What would people in the area like to see fill the space?
Nina Keck / VPR file

After an often divisive debate here in Vermont, the U.S. State Department has given approval for up to 100 refugees — mostly Syrian — to settle in Rutland over the next year.

Nina Keck / VPR file

The city of Rutland received word on Wednesday that it would be the newest site for refugee resettlement in Vermont. The city is expected to welcome 100 refugees, mostly from Syria, beginning in mid-December or early January.

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