Rutland

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Republicans will hold on to all three Rutland County Senate seats. Incumbents Kevin Mullin, Peg Flory and Brian Collamore say they're looking forward to returning to Montpelier. 

Nina Keck / VPR

Thanks to an innovative collaboration, three rundown houses in Rutland known for heavy drug trafficking will be renovated to create more affordable owner-occupied housing.

Nina Keck / VPR

In Rutland County, the race for state Senate has heated up. While the three incumbents are well-known Republicans, three democrats and an independent are vying to unseat them.

Dieu Nalio Chery / AP

Following the destruction and torrential flooding in Haiti from Hurricane Matthew, a Rutland-based nonprofit is ramping up its efforts there to provide clean water.

Nina Keck / VPR file

The city of Rutland received word on Wednesday that it would be the newest site for refugee resettlement in Vermont. The city is expected to welcome 100 refugees, mostly from Syria, beginning in mid-December or early January.

Nina Keck / VPR file

Rutland will become Vermont’s newest refugee resettlement community - that’s according to the US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, the organization that will head up the effort in Rutland.

Nina Keck / VPR file

Rutland Mayor Christopher Louras did not violate the city’s charter in his quest to make Rutland the state’s newest refugee resettlement community, according to a 26-page report by Rutland City Attorney Charles Romeo.

Nina Keck / VPR file

The Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus are officially under new ownership. For the Mitchell family that owned the papers, the sale marks the end of an era that that spanned three generations and seven decades.  

The sale of the Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus was finalized Friday afternoon.  

The sale of the Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus has been finalized. The papers were purchased by Reade Brower and Chip Harris.

Married political pundits Mary Matalin and James Carville will be at Rutland’s Paramount Theatre Sunday. It’s the latest in a 14-month series aimed at boosting civic engagement during the presidential race.

The Rutland Board of Aldermen decided in a special meeting last night to wait to publicly release the results of an investigation into whether Mayor Christopher Louras overstepped his authority when he sought to make Rutland an option for refugee resettlement.

Nina Keck / VPR

Rutland Mayor Christopher Louras wants members of the city’s Board of Aldermen to make public the results of a formal review of his conduct.

Rutland is one of more than a dozen Vermont municipalities with a combined sewer system. When the city's water treatment system is overloaded, untreated sewage and runoff flows out of this pipe into a local creek.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

Heavy rain Saturday night led to three sewage overflows in Rutland and one in Burlington in the early hours of Sunday morning.

Nina Keck / VPR

Rutland residents are still waiting to hear if their city will become Vermont’s newest refugee resettlement community. An announcement from the State Department is expected any day.

Meanwhile, both sides of the controversial issue have been hard at work.

Courtesy of Mary Nemeth

Many people in Rutland are debating what impact new refugees would have on the city. But immigrants from Italy, Ireland and Eastern Europe have already left indelible marks on the city.

A plan to resettle up to 100 Syrian refugees in Rutland continues to draw supporters, detractors and a lot of questions from people who just want to know more about what exactly it would mean for the city.

The Rutland Herald and   Barre-Montpelier Times Argus are in the process of being sold to two out of state partners, ending the two papers' run as the longest continuously owned family newspapers in America.

The sale was announced late Wednesday night amid a controversy over checks that bounced for newsroom staffers and the firing of a long time editor who wanted to print a follow up story about those financial troubles.

The Rutland Herald is dealing with fallout from a story that called its own financial status into question. Not long after the Herald ran a story that staffers and freelancers hadn’t been getting paid, the newspaper’s publisher, John Mitchell, fired news editor Alan Keays.

Nina Keck / VPR File

The Rutland Herald may be facing serious financial trouble. On Friday, the paper ran an article that reported bounced paychecks for some of the news staff. That same day, longtime news editor Alan Keays was fired for approving a follow up story.

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