Science

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab, courtesy

It was a violent collision hundreds of millions of light years away, the likes of which forged the gold found in our jewelry and the uranium in our stockpile of nuclear bombs. Scientists around the globe announced Monday groundbreaking observations of two neutron stars crashing together at nearly the speed of light. A Dartmouth physicist asserts it's the beginning of a new field of scientific discovery.

Courtesy Ryan McDevitt

For many scientists, turning the results of their research into tools, products or patents means navigating the challenging — and often foreign — world of business. However, a "Shark Tank"-like effort at the University of Vermont that connects research scientists with industry leaders may offer a solution.

Screenshot by Sam Gale Rosen / Interactive map from VCGI

Maps have come a long way. We've gone from "here be dragons" on parchment scrolls to an age of satellites, plane-mounted lasers, and democratization - everyone can now be his or her own cartographer. We're diving deep into the latest on what maps are, what they might become, and what we can learn from them.

Spider web on a piece of barbed wire.
Natcha29 / iStockphoto.com

Scientists are trying to unlock some of the secrets of spider silk by sequencing the genetic code of the spiders themselves. One new study is led by the University of Vermont and the University of Pennsylvania.

My latest strategy for achieving greater political peace of mind is to think Cassini. Not Oleg Cassini, the famous fashion designer, but Cassini the space probe, launched in 1997 to explore the planet Saturn.

BraunS / iStock

Is our country losing faith in science? Can scientists stick up for the value of the scientific method — and its place in society — without being sucked into politicized debate and partisan squabbles?

Patti Daniels / VPR

On Monday morning, new data was released on police traffic stops from more than two dozen local police departments in Vermont. The researchers who compiled the data say black and Hispanic drivers are significantly more likely to be stopped by police in Vermont than white drivers.

University of Vermont

In the State of the Union address this year, President Obama pushed for what he called a "cancer moonshot," that would pump more funding into efforts researching treatments and cures for cancer. We're looking at some of the cutting-edge cancer research going on locally, and talking to the scientists who are carrying it out. 

NASA/ESA

An astrophysicist at McGill University in Montreal has achieved some significant milestones.

At age 48, Victoria Kaspi is now tied for the youngest person to win the Gerhard Herzberg Award – Canada’s top prize from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. And she’s the first woman to do so.

WAYNE PERRY / AP

This weekend, Miss Vermont decided to forgo dance shoes and sheet music during the talent portion of Miss America 2016 for more unconventional props: beakers, protective goggles and a lab coat.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Since the 1920s, the Springfield Telescope Makers have been hosting the annual Stellafane Convention. This year's convention will run from August 13-16.

We're looking at the long history of Stellafane, and how Springfield became a center for amateur astronomy and a pilgrimage site for telescope-makers and stargazers of every stripe.

petersimoncik / iStock.com

In 2006, the United States introduced a vaccine for rotavirus, the illness that causes diarrhea and can lead to dehydration, fever and, in severe cases, death. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that almost all children had one bout of rotavirus by the time they were 5.

NASA

Shrugging off its ignominious downgrading from planet to dwarf planet status a few years back, Pluto burst back into the public spotlight when a space probe passed closer to it than any spacecraft ever had before, returning some stunning images of Pluto and its moons. 

Bruce Duncan

The Terasem Movement Foundation is located in an unassuming yellow house on a dirt road in the woods of Lincoln Vermont. Inside, however, things are happening that seem more like science fiction than real life.

A robotic human head sits on a desk next to a computer, ready to discuss philosophy with visitors. In the basement, DNA samples are cryogenically frozen for the purpose of far-future cloning. And computers store the personality traits of volunteers, to be transformed into digital avatars or beamed into deep space.

Editrix / Flickr

Forget decades and centuries. We're looking at deep time, millions and billions of years, and how the epochs have shaped the state's landscape. How Vermont's geologic history has given us the ground we walk on and the mountains we marvel at.

Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array / NASA

In 1859 people across the country were roused in the middle of the night by a light so bright you could read by it. This event, caused by a series of large solar eruptions, became known as the Carrington Event.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

As many outdoorsy Vermonters are discovering, ticks are in plentiful supply this summer. Bad news for humans at risk for Lyme disease. But the bumper crop is providing ample specimens to study and, amazingly, to dissect with some really tiny scalpels.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

MRSA, short for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, is one of the most dangerous infections you can get. It’s usually a skin disease, it's often transmitted in hospitals and it resists many antibiotics.

But researchers at Dartmouth’s Thayer School of Engineering believe they have discovered a novel kind of treatment for the MRSA bacteria.

Linda Marie B. / iStock

As recent as a few decades back, many may have scoffed at the notion that the common birds flying among us are in fact close living relatives of the dinosaurs that roamed the earth over 60 million years ago.

propheta / iStock

You may be of the belief that a spoonful of maple syrup helps the medicine go down – and now preliminary research from McGill University suggests that maple syrup may also help the medicine do its job.

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