Series And Specials

'JOLTED' is VPR's five-part podcast about a school shooting that didn’t happen, and the surprising things that did. It launches September 6, 2018.
Aaron Shrewsbury For VPR

Vermont Public Radio has launched JOLTED, a five-part podcast about a school shooting that didn’t happen, the line between thought and crime, and a Republican governor in a rural state who changed his mind about gun laws.

An image of the Vermont state flag.
btgbtg / iStock.com

A new VPR-Vermont PBS Poll out Monday takes the pulse of Vermonters ahead of the upcoming 2018 elections. We're digging into the poll results and looking at what issues Vermonters say are most important.

Green Mountain Conservation Camp instructors take part in aquatic ecology training at Buck Lake the week before the first campers arrive.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

There are plenty of lake homes in Woodbury, but not on Buck Lake. It's pretty much only home to a Green Mountain Conservation Camp.

An illustration of a car pulled over on a road by a police officer and the cop is talking to the driver. There is a blue sky, green mountains and a grey house in the background.
Illustration: Aaron Shrewsbury / For VPR

If you got a traffic ticket in Vermont last year, you’re not alone.

Law enforcement issued more than 24,000 tickets worth upwards of $4 million in fines to drivers in Vermont in 2017. A quarter were issued in just three Vermont towns: Plymouth, Bridgewater and Mount Tabor. 

 We'll look at how this generation of Vermonters is redefining what it means to grow old.
stockstudioX / iStock

By 2030, the number of Vermonters over 65 will grow by 50 percent. Baby boomers rarely do things the same way their parents did, and retirement is no exception. We're looking at how this generation of Vermonters is redefining what it means to grow old.

ImagineGolf / iStock

After multiple reports of Vermont inmates who died of cancer after serving time in the state’s prison system, VPR’s Taylor Dobbs spoke with Vermont Edition about those cases and the limited transparency of health care provided to Vermont's inmate population.

Taylor Dobbs, Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

From Jan. 1, 2011 to the end of December, 2016, 420 people died in Vermont from gunshot wounds. The majority of those people died by suicide. For the Gunshots project, VPR created a database of all 420 of those deaths in an effort to better understand the issue of gun deaths in Vermont.

Copley Hospital

People who are suffering psychiatric episodes can end up in the emergency rooms of community hospitals, where doctors and nurses say they are not equipped to provide the treatment these patients need. As Vermont Edition begins a week-long exploration of mental health care in Vermont, we look at the problem of emergency psychiatric care.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The State Board of Education is proposing some controversial new rules, which some private school advocates say threaten the very existence of some of these schools. And one of the big issues of contention is special education.

Evan Vucci / AP

On Election Day, nearly one in three Vermont voters cast ballots for Donald J. Trump — and VPR reporters teamed up with Brave Little State to hear from a few of them.

Emily Alfin Johnson & Angela Evancie / VPR

According to the latest VPR Poll, Vermonters have been following the races for president and governor very closely. But the rest of the Vermont races, not so much. It's OK — that's where we come in.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Who leads the race for president and the key statewide offices in Vermont? What are the top issues on voters' minds and how much do they trust some of Vermont's institutions? VPR has once again partnered with The Castleton Polling Institute to ask Vermonters what you think about the big issues facing our state and the choices voters face on Nov. 8.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Even as wind and solar energy have grown to nearly 10 percent of New England's energy mix, they're still not a reliable power source. Wind and sunshine can't simply be turned on and off with a switch. A new software company is hoping to use a simple appliance in your basement — your water heater — to store that sporadic renewable energy and transform the way the electricity grid works. 

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Who do Vermonters favor in the presidential race? How do Vermonters view the candidates for the key statewide offices? And what are the most important issues facing our state today?

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

What do Vermonters think about the coming election? What about renewable energy? Guns? Marijuana? School consolidation? The VPR Poll has some answers.

Nina Keck / VPR

By the time Gov. Peter Shumlin shined a spotlight on Vermont’s heroin problem in his 2014 State of the State address, Rutland had been actively battling the issue for more than a year, opening a methadone clinic and launching an innovative multi-pronged, community-based approach called Project Vision.

Aleksangel / iStock.com

Vermont’s state government is contemplating at least $1 billion of information technology projects in the coming years. The wish list is long, and some projects — even important ones — are likely to stay on it for a long time.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

If you’ve had a medical appointment lately, you’ve probably seen your provider peering at your medical history on a computer. Many doctors and patients are happy that paper records are giving way to digital information. But there are concerns that electronic health records can be hacked, and that physicians are now spending too much time with computers and not enough with patients. 

Angela Evancie / VPR File

More than two-thirds of the problematic phosphorus overload in Lake Champlain comes from Vermont. To clean up its act the state recently signed Act 64, the Vermont Clean Water Act. It tackles runoff coming from sources varying from roofs and roads to forests and farms.

Steve Zind / VPR

Statistics abound of families plunged into economic hardship. The reasons are many: Bad luck, bad choices or a bad economy. In their case, Pat Keogh and his wife Cathleen Branon-Keogh found themselves struggling to get by despite their best efforts.

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