Skiing

Hannah Weiss installing automated temperature sensors on a snow pile at Craftsbury Outdoor Center.
Paul Bierman / The University of Vermont

In the heat of summer, snow is the last thing you’d expect to find in the Vermont woods. But at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center this summer, that’s exactly what you’ll find — after a bit of digging — that is.

Skiers on a sunny day at Okemo Mountain Resort.
Okemo Mountain Resort, courtesy

Vail Resorts is acquiring two more East Coast ski mountains: Okemo Mountain Resort in Vermont and Mount Sunapee Resort in New Hampshire.

Dylan Fortin, who's 24 and from Barton, Vermont has been competing in Special Olympics since he was 8. His mother Gail says he loves to re-connect every year with friends.
Nina Keck / VPR

The annual Special Olympics Vermont Winter Games took place at Pico Mountain Resort, with nearly 200 athletes competing this year.

Alex Jospe was on the U.S. National ski orienteering team from 2007 to 2015, and she set the course for this week's ski orienteering world cup in Craftsbury.
Alex Jospe / courtesy

World class athletes from teams around the world are gathering in Craftsbury, Vermont for the final event in the Ski Orienteering World Cup this week. Never heard of SkiO? You're not alone.

A group of friends from the Boston area spends a day at Killington recently.
Nina Keck / VPR

It may be too soon to say how this year’s ski season will ultimately turn out, but for many resorts and related businesses, the weather so far has been a frustrating roller coaster.

In the last event of her last Olympics – she has been to five – Kikkan Randall finally did what no American woman had ever done: win a medal in cross-country skiing. And she made it a gold, as Randall and her teammate Jessica Diggins won the team sprint free final at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

Tim Van Orden of Bennington wears a blue coat and runs on snowshoes through some snowy trees.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

This March, a national snowshoe race will make its way back to Vermont.

Snowshoe racing may not be in the Olympics (yet), but for one Bennington resident, the spectacle of hundreds of people racing through a winter wonderland on snowshoes just might be ready for primetime.

Olympian Sophie Caldwell in a photo outdoors with her grandfather John Caldwell.
Courtesy

You don't have to go far to pass the torch to the next generation of great athletes in Vermont, because in the Green Mountain State, Olympic bloodlines are all in the family.

Courtesy

As the Winter Olympics kicks off, the U.S. Women's cross-country ski team — including those with ties to Vermont like Ida Sargent, Jessie Diggins, Liz Stephen, Sophie Caldwell, Kaitlynn Miller, and Caitlin Patterson — is favored to bring home a number of medals.

Courtesy / AP

Ski icon and filmmaker Warren Miller died last week at the age of 93. For decades, ski fans have watched his films each fall to inspire themselves for the upcoming ski season. 

Rory Gawler bought a big, old farmhouse in Lebanon about seven or eight years ago. It has beautiful views of the Mascoma River valley and a little orchard in the backyard. 

It’s mostly surrounded by open space, but next door — and really, right next door — is another house that’s not in good shape. Lebanon’s property records list it in “very poor” condition. It’s run-down and sprawling, with low ceilings and peeling walls. There’s even trees growing up through the pool outside, Gawler said. 

This weekend’s World Cup at Killington is expected to boost excitement among existing skiers. But one group also believes it can help create new skiers.

Colorful banners on Killington's access road tout the upcoming Women's World Cup races November 25-26. An estimated 30,000 people came to see the event last year.
Nina Keck / VPR

An estimated 30,000 people packed Killington last November to see the worlds fastest women go head to head in slalom and giant slalom.

Ski lift in Killington, Vermont in November 2016.
Mike Groll / Associated Press

A couple Vermont ski resorts are up and running, but instead of hitting the slopes, we're going to chat about some of the industry changes and challenges here in the state.

Jeb Wallace-Brodeur / Ski Vermont

The Vermont ski industry is worried about the Trump Administration's review of the J-1 visa exchange program which allows resorts to hire some foreign workers.

A new video, launching a $200,000 marketing campaign, focuses on Rutland County as a mountain biking destination.
screenshot from promotional video

Organizers hope a new $200,000 marketing initiative showcasing Rutland County — rebranded as the Killington Valley — will entice professionals in cities like New York and Boston to visit the region.

Mount Snow is using $22 million in EB-5 funding for a new ski lodge at the resort's Carinthia section, and another $30 million for a snow making expansion.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

After months of delays in securing its EB-5 funding, Mount Snow is finally moving ahead with a $52 million upgrade.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Vail Resorts' acquisition of Stowe Mountain Resort has been finalized. 

Chandler Burgess / Associated Press/Killington Resort

Recent ski area acquisitions in Vermont are changing the season ski pass market in the state. Single-resort passes are giving way to discounted multi-mountain offerings. 

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

In February, Vail Resorts jumped into the eastern ski market with its planned purchase of the Stowe Mountain Resort. The $50 million sale is expected to close in June, and Vail has kept the buzz going with other investments and announcements.

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