Supreme Court

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Brett Kavanaugh.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press

Both of Vermont's two U.S. senators are expressing very strong concerns about President Donald Trump's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Updated at 9:28 p.m. ET

President Trump has chosen Brett Kavanaugh to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. If confirmed, Trump's choice would solidify the high court's conservative majority and continue the president's push to shift the federal bench to the right.

Trump announced his choice with a prime-time address from the White House East Room.

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner gives a thumbs up outside the Supreme Court, Wednesday, in Washington. The Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that government workers can't be forced to contribute to labor unions that represent them in collective bargaining.
Andrew Harnik / AP

Public-sector unions in Vermont are denouncing Wednesday's Supreme Court decision that says nonunion members cannot be asked to help pay for collective bargaining.

The Vermont Supreme Court. The Vermont Supreme Court overturned the conviction of a man who left KKK recruitment flyers at the Burlington homes of two women of color. The court said the state failed to prove the action constituted an immediate threat.
John Dillon / VPR File

The Vermont Supreme Court has ruled in favor of a Vermont inmate who claims the state violated the law when it awarded a contract for telephone services provided to inmates.

fstop123 / iStock

Child abuse and neglect cases are overwhelming the Family Division of the Vermont Court system, a situation that Court Administrator Patricia Gabel says, “has stretched existing resources to the breaking point."

Among June’s Supreme Court releases was a short per curium ruling in Hernández v. Mesa. It didn’t get much coverage – the Justices basically sent everything back to the lower court. But, the case itself raised some of the most controversial questions of the term … and the Court’s attempt to avoid answering them spoke volumes.

Senator Bernie Sanders says he strongly supports a decision by Democratic Senate leaders to filibuster, or indefinitely block, consideration of President Trump's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press file

Vermont's two U.S. senators are opposing Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's pick to the Supreme Court. But the Senate is also on the verge of changing how it considers such controversial nominations in the future.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Both of Vermont's U.S. senators, Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders, say they plan to question President Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court, Neil Gorsuch, on a number of specific issues.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

The state of Vermont wants access to the claims data of companies that fund their own health insurance plans. But not all of them are willing to hand it over. And the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to resolve a legal dispute that could have national impacts on health care reform.

Susan Walsh / AP File

This spring, the U.S. Supreme Court will take up two questions of same-sex marriage: whether states should be permitted to ban it, and whether they must recognize same-sex marriages from other states. 

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

The city of Burlington is no longer enforcing an ordinance that prohibits people from demonstrating or protesting within a 35-foot buffer zone surrounding family planning clinics. The city ordinance is similar to a Massachusetts law that was struck down last week by the U.S. Supreme Court.