Supreme Court

Updated at 11:31 p.m. ET

A sharply divided Senate — reflecting a deeply divided nation — voted almost entirely along party lines Saturday afternoon to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

A little more than two hours later, Kavauangh was sworn in during a private ceremony as protesters stood on the court's steps.

Watch: Kavanaugh Confirmed To Supreme Court

Oct 6, 2018
 Judge Brett Kavanaugh, pictured here during his confirmation hearing on Sept. 4, with a variety of lights in the background.
Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

The U.S. Senate held its final vote Saturday on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

A profile headshot of Brett Kavanaugh on a black background.
Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

Update 11:11 a.m. This morning the U.S. Senate held a cloture vote to close debate regarding U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, which advanced on a vote of 51-49.

Updated at 7:51 a.m. ET on Thursday

The FBI's highly anticipated supplemental background check on Brett Kavanaugh was sent to the White House and Capitol Hill overnight, with senators set to review the report on Thursday in the final chapter of what has become a deeply acrimonious confirmation battle.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced the planned arrival of the report on Wednesday night and said all senators would get a chance to review it ahead of the next procedural milestones in the chamber.

The sign outside a wood door that reads Committee on the Judiciary: This room is equipped with an assistive listening system. Please silence all electronic devices before entering. SD 226
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh will be back before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday, as will Christine Blasey Ford, who alleges Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in the 1980s. Kavanaugh denies the allegations.

The Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled to hear this week from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and his accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, over sexual assault allegations.

Sen. Patrick Leahy says GOP leaders are blocking the release of key information concerning allegations of sexual assault brought against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh
Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press

Sen. Patrick Leahy is accusing Senate Republican leaders of trying to block an investigation into the facts around allegations of sexual assault that have been brought against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh looks at notes during the third day of his confirmation hearings on Capitol Hill.
Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

For coverage of the Sept. 27 testimony of Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh, click here.

It's day four of the Senate Judiciary Committee's confirmation hearings on the U.S. Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

Sen. Patrick Leahy is the senior member of two Senate committees that are investigating possible ties between the Trump campaign and Russian officials
Susan Walsh / AP File

Sen. Patrick Leahy says the U.S. Senate needs to review the full paper trail involving Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Brett Kavanaugh.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press

Both of Vermont's two U.S. senators are expressing very strong concerns about President Donald Trump's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Updated at 9:28 p.m. ET

President Trump has chosen Brett Kavanaugh to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. If confirmed, Trump's choice would solidify the high court's conservative majority and continue the president's push to shift the federal bench to the right.

Trump announced his choice with a prime-time address from the White House East Room.

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner gives a thumbs up outside the Supreme Court, Wednesday, in Washington. The Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that government workers can't be forced to contribute to labor unions that represent them in collective bargaining.
Andrew Harnik / AP

Public-sector unions in Vermont are denouncing Wednesday's Supreme Court decision that says nonunion members cannot be asked to help pay for collective bargaining.

The Vermont Supreme Court. The Vermont Supreme Court overturned the conviction of a man who left KKK recruitment flyers at the Burlington homes of two women of color. The court said the state failed to prove the action constituted an immediate threat.
John Dillon / VPR File

The Vermont Supreme Court has ruled in favor of a Vermont inmate who claims the state violated the law when it awarded a contract for telephone services provided to inmates.

fstop123 / iStock

Child abuse and neglect cases are overwhelming the Family Division of the Vermont Court system, a situation that Court Administrator Patricia Gabel says, “has stretched existing resources to the breaking point."

Among June’s Supreme Court releases was a short per curium ruling in Hernández v. Mesa. It didn’t get much coverage – the Justices basically sent everything back to the lower court. But, the case itself raised some of the most controversial questions of the term … and the Court’s attempt to avoid answering them spoke volumes.

Senator Bernie Sanders says he strongly supports a decision by Democratic Senate leaders to filibuster, or indefinitely block, consideration of President Trump's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press file

Vermont's two U.S. senators are opposing Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's pick to the Supreme Court. But the Senate is also on the verge of changing how it considers such controversial nominations in the future.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Both of Vermont's U.S. senators, Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders, say they plan to question President Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court, Neil Gorsuch, on a number of specific issues.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

The state of Vermont wants access to the claims data of companies that fund their own health insurance plans. But not all of them are willing to hand it over. And the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to resolve a legal dispute that could have national impacts on health care reform.

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