Technology

We're talking with energy experts and environmental advocates about assessing "renewability" when it comes to renewable energy.
DrAfter123 / iStock

Vermont is striving to meet ambitious goals to get 90 percent of its energy from renewable sources by 2050. But just how renewable is some of that energy? We're talking with energy experts and environmental advocates about how we assess renewability and other environmental costs to alternative energy sources.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

The state has decided to give up on CoverageCo, the troubled cell service company that abruptly began turning off its network earlier this year.

Italy as seen from the space shuttle Endeavour while docked at the International Space Station in May 2011.
NASA's Johnson Space Center

But Why is VPR's podcast for curious kids, and it's taking over Vermont Edition to answer questions about space with St. Michael's College astronomer and physicist John O'Meara.

Cyclists outside the Island House in South Hero.
Luis Vivanco, courtesy

Vermonters can now access more than 200 years of newspapers online after the Vermont secretary of state's office worked with Newspapers.com to make millions of pages of old papers from the 1700s up to 1922 available for free.

The online archive gives readers a glimpse into almost any day in Vermont history. And one scholar at the University of Vermont is using the archive to trace the surprising role bicycles have played in social change in Vermont.

Analog, digital or a combination of the two? We're looking at the digital tools and the analog alternatives we use every day.
elenabs / iStock

Technology shapes how we interact with people and the world around us, but many still feel the pull of the analog in our increasingly digital lives. We're talking about the digital tools and their analog alternatives we use every day and how each affects our thinking in different ways.

An open laptop on a surface in a dark room.
dejankrsmanovic / iStock

Two Vermonters were indicted in federal court after being caught in an undercover Department of Justice operation focused on people selling drugs and weapons on the darkweb.

The Icecube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole sits atop an array of detectors buried deep within the clear antarctic ice.
Courtesy of National Science Foundation

It's a cutting-edge telescope buried a mile under the ice at the South Pole, but in many ways, the Icecube Neutrino Observatory is hardly a telescope at all. It doesn't point up at the sky; in fact, it points down, looking through the earth. It's just one of the paradoxical parts of a new field of astronomy looking at the universe by tracking the elusive “ghost particle” known as the neutrino. 

The World Health Organization now recognizes what it calls "gaming disorder," but treatment and what qualifies under the disorder is still being defined.
vitapix / iStock

Kids can easily lose themselves in the virtual worlds of video games, but what happens when gaming goes beyond a hobby and becomes a problem? The World Health Organization now recognizes “gaming disorder,” and we're looking at the details of the diagnosis and what it means for kids in Vermont.

Hannah Weiss installing automated temperature sensors on a snow pile at Craftsbury Outdoor Center.
Paul Bierman / The University of Vermont

In the heat of summer, snow is the last thing you’d expect to find in the Vermont woods. But at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center this summer, that’s exactly what you’ll find — after a bit of digging — that is.

A UMass Amherst nursing professor has been named to a national panel of inventors -- the first nurse to be honored alongside engineers and computer scientists from companies like Microsoft and IBM.

A member of the College of St. Joseph esports team during practice.
College of St. Joseph, Courtesy

As video games like League of Legends and Fortnite have grown in popularity, so have competitions involving these games. Now the College of St. Joseph in Rutland has added esports to its athletic roster, alongside the likes of soccer, basketball and volleyball. Despite the school's struggles with enrollment and plans to avoid closure, the program has now added a new esports arena.

We're talking about the law that reimburses out-of-staters up to $10,000 to move to Vermont to work remotely, and how it fits into the state's strategy on jobs and attracting workers.
Infadel / iStock

By now you've probably heard about the law that reimburses out-of-staters up to $10,000 to move to Vermont to work remotely. We're talking about that plan and the big reaction it's getting, both positive and negative. Plus, how remote work fits into Vermont's economy and what else the state is doing to support it as an option.

The U.S. takes credit for creating the Internet, and the European Union seems determined to govern it. On Friday, a sweeping new directive goes into effect called the General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR. Taken together, its 99 articles represent the biggest ever change to data privacy laws. The new rules have implications for U.S. Internet users too.

Here are answers to three questions you might have about the new law and its potential impacts.

What is GDPR?

courtesy

This Saturday is the 48th annual Green Up Day, when volunteers across the state collect litter from roadsides and public spaces.

Burlington Code Academy founders (right to left) Alex Horner, Benny Boas and Alex Chaffee hope their company will attract tech workers to the state. Their course teaches computer programing and project management skills.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

In 12-weeks you’ll be a software developer. That’s the hope of a Burlington startup that aims to teach students computing coding skills.

Now after months of developing, networking and building their business, the trio behind Burlington's new coding boot camp is ready to welcome their first class in a matter of weeks.

Kids, parents and schools all are still figuring out how to deal with the increased connectivity offered by smartphones and social media.
milicad / iStock

Kids are growing up amidst the constant connectivity offered by smartphones and social media. We're talking about how parents, schools and young people themselves think about the technology in their lives and how they use it so that the benefits outweigh the risks.

Hackers are getting increasingly sophisticated in their methods for going after your information and money.
Ijubaphoto / iStock

It's a new state agency that most people have never heard of and its primary job is to protect all of the state's computer systems and data from a cyber attack. Agency secretary John Quinn says it's an ongoing and relentless battle.

Social media images and tweets of "Ricky Vaugh" were revealed to be by Vermont-native and Middlebury grad Douglass Mackey.
Facebook/Twitter

Twitter user Ricky Vaughn has been called "Trump’s most influential white nationalist troll." The account drew attention during the 2016 presidential election for political (and often white nationalist and anti-Semitic) posts. Huffington Post reporter Luke O'Brien found the man behind the handle is Waterbury native and Middlebury graduate Douglass Mackey.

What's blockchain? The unqiue computer network is a new piece of financial technology that Vermont lawmakers believe offers big opportunities for the state.
MF3d / iStock

Bitcoin. Cryptocurrency. These and other buzzwords make headlines in the world of finance, but underlying it all is a new piece of financial technology called blockchain. And state lawmakers are betting this new technology could be Vermont's next moneymaker, much like the state's captive insurance market.

Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook, arrives for a Capitol Hill Meeting with Sen. Bill Nelson on Monday. Later in the week, Zuckerberg will be testifying before members of Congress about how Facebook data was used in the 2016 election."
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Sen. Patrick Leahy says Congress should demand that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg give a full accounting about why the company allowed a political consulting firm to obtain profiles of more than 87 million of its users during the 2016 presidential campaign.

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