University of Vermont Medical Center

Green Mountain Surgery Center in Colchester will be Vermont's first independent surgical center. State regulators have approved construction of the facility despite protest from nonprofit hospitals.
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State regulators have approved construction of what would be Vermont’s first independent surgical center, despite protests from nonprofit hospitals who say the venture will siphon needed revenue away from their operating rooms.

Dr. Ajay Tunguturi, a neurologist at the University of Vermont Medical Center, demonstrates telemedicine with a mock patient connected securely from Rutland Regional Medical Center.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Health insurance in Vermont will soon be required to cover medical care delivered via telemedicine, even if the patient receiving the treatment isn't at a doctor's office.

On Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, police responded to reports of an active shooter at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. The hospital is pictured above in a photo from October 2015.
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At the end of May, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center will be closing a program that treats a wide range of women's reproductive hormonal and infertility issues. And that has left a lot of women in the Upper Valley angry.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

The University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington is one of four hospitals that have agreed to get reimbursed for Medicaid patients based on a pre-set per-patient per-month fee.

The University of Vermont Medical Center is funding the purchase of a Burlington motel as a way to reduce health care costs.

The World Medical Association is urging health organizations around the globe to take their money out of fossil fuels. Two of the region's largest medical institutions still hold stock in fossil fuel companies.

Courtesy, University of Vermont Medical Center

More than 100 pieces by Vermont artists are on display, available to browse and search in a virtual gallery whose beginnings sprang from the desire to honor the memory of a loved one.

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The challenge faced by people struggling with addiction has been exacerbated by lengthy waitlists for treatment. The backlog is now starting to shrink. And the positive trend is thanks in part to local doctors making a special effort to do more.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Gov. Peter Shumlin's ambitious plan to have Vermont become the first single-payer health care state in the U.S. never materialized, but in a quieter way, the health care system in Vermont is changing.

Felipe Dana / AP

The University of Vermont Vaccine Testing Center has been selected to help test a potential vaccine that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is developing against the Zika virus.

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Injuries to the human lung can be life-threatening, and also very difficult to treat. When there's a hole that punctures the lung, some sealants exist to patch it, but breathing in and out means air is moving around, and keeping that patch in place is tricky to say the least.

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For many new mothers, breastfeeding is a boon. It’s healthy for them and for their babies. But some mothers have more milk than they can use, and others have less, or none. 

In past generations, women who did not have enough breast milk for their babies or who chose not to nurse them turned to wet nurses. These days, women still share milk – some even sell it – and many use social media as a market or bartering place. Doctors say that kind of casual networking can be risky. They urge women to get their supply only from hospitals working with breast milk banks that pasteurize and test every drop.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

The University of Vermont Medical Center waited seven weeks to implement changes in the way nurses prepare and administer drugs after a patient was killed by a Ketamine overdose accidentally injected by a nurse, documents show.

UVM College of Medicine

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa finally seems to be slowing down. But still, the disease has already killed nearly 9,000 people in West Africa alone. Dr. Margaret Tandoh spent seven weeks treating patients in her native Liberia, where she set up an Ebola treatment center.

In late January, she returned to her day job as an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. She spoke with VPR about her experiences treating patients with the deadly disease in Liberia.