The Vermont Economy

The home for VPR's coverage of economic issues affecting the state of Vermont as well as business and industry developments across the region.

VPR reporter Bob Kinzel covers economic issues from the Statehouse Bureau in Montpelier. In addition, All Things Considered Host/Reporter Henry Epp covers business from Colchester.

Follow Bob Kinzel and Henry Epp on Twitter for the latest Vermont Economy news. 

Explore our coverage by topic or chronologically by scrolling through the list below

Aging Well | Homelessness & Housing | Dairy Industry | EB-5

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Have an economy-related news tip that requires investigation?

Reach out to VPR's Investigations Desk.

Deb Snell with the nurses' union at UVM Medical Center addresses reporters ahead of the July work stoppage.
Henry Epp / VPR

After months of negotiations between the UVM Medical Center and the hospital's nurses' union yielded no new contract, UVMMC administrators have made what they call their "last, best and final offer." 

Vermont's combined aerospace manufacturing and civil aviation industry accounts for $2 billion a year in economic output.
Serts / iStock

Live call-in discussion: It's out there, quietly accounting for $2 billion in economic output each year. It's Vermont's aerospace industry, creating 9,500 jobs in commercial aviation and around 3,600 manufacturing positions. Vermont Edition takes a closer look at this stealth industry.

A pile of bags and other personal belongings in a church basement.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

On some of the coldest nights of the year, a state-run program helps find emergency housing for people. The Vermont Department for Children and Families is now planning a revamp of the rules that govern this program, which has been around for more than 50 years.

AP/Toby Talbot

The state will expand a high-speed broadband network that could serve hundreds of customers in the Northeast Kingdom.

A streetview of downtown Wilmington, Vermont.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Selectboard member Ann Manwaring says the town of Wilmington is considering a proposal to ban plastic bags and will take up the issue at its next meeting.

Maple syrup in glass leaf-shaped bottles.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

After announcing earlier this summer that they would reconsider a proposed "added sugar" label on maple syrup and honey, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has officially decided to scrap that plan.

Newport on Lake Memphremagog
John Dillon / VPR

The small Northeast Kingdom city of Newport has its economic hopes pegged to a long-neglected asset: Lake Memphremagog.

Adam Silver stands looking out of a window in a Brattleboro apartment.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As companies like Uber and Airbnb continue growing across Vermont, two new state laws to better regulate the "gig economy" are now in effect. 

Moats: Labor Today

Sep 3, 2018
Saklakova / iStock

Vermont’s labor history includes the farm work that took place in virtually every town — the farm families who labored every day to till rocky fields, bring in the crops and tend to their animals.

Officer Ryan Washburn, left, and Everyone's Books co-owner Nancy Braus stand in the Brattleboro bookstore.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A bookstore owner in Brattleboro is donating books to the Police Department for individuals who have to spend the night locked up, waiting to be arraigned.

A three-panel picture with downtown scenes from Barre City, Montpelier in winter, and the roundabout in Winooski.
Left to right: Steve Zind, Kirk Carapezza, Angela Evancie / VPR

This week, the Vermont chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union sent letters to six cities and towns demanding they repeal local ordinances that ban panhandling. 

Martin Schreiner and Lucas Hough stand on the front porch of their new home in Rutland.
Green Mountain Power, Courtesy

A couple from New York City are the winners of Green Mountain Power’s "Innovation Home" giveaway contest in Rutland. 

Demolition on a downtown Burlington mall, seen here in June, began earlier this year. Construction on a redevelopment at the site has been paused for several weeks.
Henry Epp / VPR

Earlier this year, a mall in downtown Burlington was mostly demolished in order to make way for a mixed-use development that would include a 14-story building, which would be the tallest in the city.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

The state has decided to give up on CoverageCo, the troubled cell service company that abruptly began turning off its network earlier this year.

Front Porch Forum

I recently requested a recommendation on Front Porch Forum for a good plumber who was creative and had dealt with old houses.

Mobile phone antennaes on a telecommunication tower on a blue-sky background.
Emanuele D'Amico / iStock

The state wants to make it easier for telecommunication companies to upgrade their cell towers.

There are growing opportunities for Vermont's forestland owners in the global carbon markets.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Vermont has been part of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative for about a decade. But with emerging carbon markets, the state can play a role in California's move to meet its greenhouse gas reduction goals as well as those of foreign companies. We'll learn about these markets and efforts to include Vermont landowners.

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LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

To New England now. Maple syrup, cheese and ski resorts are staples of Vermont's economy, and the state may soon be adding hemp to that list. The plant's fiber has been used for fabric for millennia, but Vermont farmers are growing hemp for its purported medicinal properties.

James A. Cumming

I never thought too deeply about the details of what it takes to keep New England looking – well – like New England.

Viv Buckley and Des Hertz take a spin on the Kingdom Trails. Women make up between 30 and 40 percent of riders on the Northeast Kingdom trail network.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Mountain biking is big business in parts of the Northeast Kingdom. But what started out as a way to promote tourism has turned into a way of life for some residents.

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