The Vermont Economy

The home for VPR's coverage of economic issues affecting the state of Vermont as well as business and industry developments across the region.

VPR reporter Bob Kinzel covers economic issues from the Statehouse Bureau in Montpelier. In addition, All Things Considered Host/Reporter Henry Epp covers business from Colchester.

Follow Bob Kinzel and Henry Epp on Twitter for the latest Vermont Economy news. 

Explore our coverage by topic or chronologically by scrolling through the list below

Aging Well | Homelessness & Housing | Dairy Industry | EB-5

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Have an economy-related news tip that requires investigation?

Reach out to VPR's Investigations Desk.

Adam Silver stands looking out of a window in a Brattleboro apartment.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As companies like Uber and Airbnb continue growing across Vermont, two new state laws to better regulate the "gig economy" are now in effect. 

Moats: Labor Today

Sep 3, 2018
Saklakova / iStock

Vermont’s labor history includes the farm work that took place in virtually every town — the farm families who labored every day to till rocky fields, bring in the crops and tend to their animals.

Officer Ryan Washburn, left, and Everyone's Books co-owner Nancy Braus stand in the Brattleboro bookstore.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A bookstore owner in Brattleboro is donating books to the Police Department for individuals who have to spend the night locked up, waiting to be arraigned.

A three-panel picture with downtown scenes from Barre City, Montpelier in winter, and the roundabout in Winooski.
Left to right: Steve Zind, Kirk Carapezza, Angela Evancie / VPR

This week, the Vermont chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union sent letters to six cities and towns demanding they repeal local ordinances that ban panhandling. 

Martin Schreiner and Lucas Hough stand on the front porch of their new home in Rutland.
Green Mountain Power, Courtesy

A couple from New York City are the winners of Green Mountain Power’s "Innovation Home" giveaway contest in Rutland. 

Demolition on a downtown Burlington mall, seen here in June, began earlier this year. Construction on a redevelopment at the site has been paused for several weeks.
Henry Epp / VPR

Earlier this year, a mall in downtown Burlington was mostly demolished in order to make way for a mixed-use development that would include a 14-story building, which would be the tallest in the city.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

The state has decided to give up on CoverageCo, the troubled cell service company that abruptly began turning off its network earlier this year.

Front Porch Forum

I recently requested a recommendation on Front Porch Forum for a good plumber who was creative and had dealt with old houses.

Mobile phone antennaes on a telecommunication tower on a blue-sky background.
Emanuele D'Amico / iStock

The state wants to make it easier for telecommunication companies to upgrade their cell towers.

There are growing opportunities for Vermont's forestland owners in the global carbon markets.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Vermont has been part of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative for about a decade. But with emerging carbon markets, the state can play a role in California's move to meet its greenhouse gas reduction goals as well as those of foreign companies. We'll learn about these markets and efforts to include Vermont landowners.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

To New England now. Maple syrup, cheese and ski resorts are staples of Vermont's economy, and the state may soon be adding hemp to that list. The plant's fiber has been used for fabric for millennia, but Vermont farmers are growing hemp for its purported medicinal properties.

James A. Cumming

I never thought too deeply about the details of what it takes to keep New England looking – well – like New England.

Viv Buckley and Des Hertz take a spin on the Kingdom Trails. Women make up between 30 and 40 percent of riders on the Northeast Kingdom trail network.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Mountain biking is big business in parts of the Northeast Kingdom. But what started out as a way to promote tourism has turned into a way of life for some residents.

AEI.org

It’s well accepted that a picture is worth a thousand words, as any visual learner or marketer will attest. But, how does one visualize something as enormous as the U.S. economy - the largest in the world at $19 trillion – and how do we view Vermont’s economy in comparison?

Shirts with Vermont Law School on them hang in Barrister's Book Shop in downtown South Royalton.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

In South Royalton, there’s a great craft beer bar, a bustling food co-op and a new coffee shop opening — but just about anyone you ask will tell you the town’s economic future depends on a healthy Vermont Law School.

Lucas Campbell operates one of the few landing crafts on Lake Champlain. Here, he readies the boat to take off from Burton Island State Park.
Henry Epp / VPR

Lake Champlain has a long history as a commercial waterway. In the 1800s, it was a crowded passage for boats hauling lumber and other goods between New York City and Montreal and points in between.

Much of that industry is long gone, but there's still some work on the lake for those who want it.

Unions representing Consolidated Communications workers say they’ve reached tentative three-year contract agreements with the company that will avert a strike.

The exterior of Memorial auditorium with a sign in front.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

The city of Burlington wants people who live and work there to weigh in on redevelopment plans for Memorial Auditorium.

Outside a barn in Lowell are a bunch of motorcycles as part of Road Pitch.
Hilary Niles / Niles Media

"There’s not enough funding in Vermont to help businesses get off the ground and grow" is a common refrain among startup and expanding businesses seeking investment capital to fuel their growth. But one unique Vermont event aims to teach entrepreneurs that, before they ask for money, they may want to first ask for advice.

More Americans will be writing a check to the IRS in April because their employers are not withholding enough from their paychecks following the new tax law, the Government Accountability Office says in a new report.

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