The Vermont Economy

The home for VPR's coverage of economic issues affecting the state of Vermont as well as business and industry developments across the region.

VPR reporter Bob Kinzel covers economic issues from the Statehouse Bureau in Montpelier. In addition, All Things Considered Host/Reporter Henry Epp covers business from Colchester.

Follow Bob Kinzel and Henry Epp on Twitter for the latest Vermont Economy news. 

Explore our coverage by topic or chronologically by scrolling through the list below

Aging Well | Homelessness & Housing | Dairy Industry | EB-5

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Reach out to VPR's Investigations Desk.

Granite, seen here at the Rock of Ages quarry in Barre, is one of Vermont's three state rocks, along with marble and slate.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Vermont has three state rocks — and with good reason. Granite, marble and slate have done a lot to shape the state economically, environmentally and demographically. On this Vermont Edition, we dig into how and why that happened.

A simultaneous training session for 175,000 employees, across more than 8,000 stores — that's what Starbucks is doing Tuesday, urging its workers and managers to discuss racial bias and respect following the arrest of two black men at a Philadelphia store last month.

For the sessions, many Starbucks stores will shut down in the afternoon and stay closed for several hours. A sign at one location in Chicago, for instance, says the store will be locking its doors at 2:30 p.m. and reopening on Wednesday. Other stores have posted similar notices.

A sign in Nanci Leitch's home in Guilford that she rents out with Airbnb.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A bill that would have placed new requirements on people who rent out their homes on websites like Airbnb will not likely survive this legislative session.

SunCommon warehouse filled with solar panels.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR File

A Vermont solar company is expanding into New York's Hudson Valley.

Don, from Greenfield, Mass. sands a countertop at The Wilson House in East Dorset.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

During the first weekend in June the Wilson House in East Dorset will hold a 30th anniversary celebration to recognize the renovations to the birthplace and childhood home of Bill Wilson, one of the co-founders of Alcoholics Anonymous.

A homeless encampment on Sears Lane in Burlington was taken down by the city last October.
Liam Connors / VPR

After last year's big debate over homelessness and violence in Vermont's largest city, Burlington officials planned to change their approach on the issue, with more emphasis on supporting the homeless community.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A superior court judge has agreed to allow a receiver to take over the Hermitage Ski Resort in Wilmington.

Around 1,500 people attended a cannabis and hemp convention in South Burlington. Even though the state's marijuana legalization law doesn't create a market to sell it, entrepreneurs still see potential opportunities in the industry.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Vermont's marijuana legalization law doesn't create a market to sell it, but that hasn't stopped people from finding ways to capitalize on legal cannabis.

Social Security can provide a nest egg for retirement, but is it enough? We'll explore questions about Social Security, including deciding when to take it.
DNY59 / iStock

The great thing about life is that you get choices. But some of them aren't easy to make, like deciding the right age at which to start taking your Social Security payments from the government. We'll help you navigate that tricky decision.

To my mind, the passing of Vermont Life Magazine is a sad and sobering cultural milestone.

I grew up reading Vermont Life in the fifties and continued reading it until shortly after the turn of the century.

Sonja Bullaty and Angelo Lomeo / Reproduced with permission from Vermont Life

Vermont Life Magazine was founded in 1946 to attract visitors by celebrating the state’s culture and natural beauty.

An issue of "Vermont Life" magazine on a table.
Henry Epp / VPR File

Days after the state announced Vermont Life magazine would end print publication, the people who hoped to continue the magazine are shaking their heads.

The minimum wage bill passed by the legislature would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024. The current minimum wage is $10.50 an hour.
Photo by Angela Evancie, illustration by Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

The Vermont legislature has passed a bill that would raise the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024. But Gov. Scott has opposed the legislation and it's a target for a veto. We're talking about what's in the bill and the debate over how it would impact the state's businesses and low-income workers.

An issue of "Vermont Life" magazine on a table.
Henry Epp / VPR File

Vermont's long-running promotional magazine will end print publication this month.

The federal office that sets milk prices for the Northeast recently allowed milk to be dumped at the farm.
VPR/Ric Cengeri

In yet another sign of the chronic milk glut that’s forced down prices paid to farmers, the federal government has allowed Northeast dairy co-ops to dump milk if they can’t find a market.

courtesy

This Saturday is the 48th annual Green Up Day, when volunteers across the state collect litter from roadsides and public spaces.

Angela Evancie / VPR

The U.S. Department of Agriculture this week released its draft rules for labeling genetically modified ingredients that are included in packaged foods.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

All sorts of handy people spent a recent Saturday in Hardwick volunteering to fix other peoples' broken stuff, and passing on a little of their know-how.

Many Vermont companies make significant charitable contributions to the local community and some, like King Arthur Flour, have even met the social, environmental and governance requirements to become B corporations. But in many ways, it’s mutual savings banks, that as a group, stand out when it comes to supporting their local community.

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