The Vermont Economy

The home for VPR's coverage of economic issues affecting the state of Vermont as well as business and industry developments across the region.

VPR reporter Bob Kinzel covers economic issues from the Statehouse Bureau in Montpelier. In addition, All Things Considered Host/Reporter Henry Epp covers business from Colchester.

Follow Bob Kinzel and Henry Epp on Twitter for the latest Vermont Economy news. 

Explore our coverage by topic or chronologically by scrolling through the list below

Aging Well | Homelessness & Housing | Dairy Industry | EB-5

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Creative Commons / Pexels

powerful wind storm raked Vermont a week ago, reminding many just how vulnerable the state's electric grid can be to severe weather. As climate change models forecast more unpredictable weather in the future, are Vermont utilities ready for the challenges of climate change?

Striking workers have reached an agreement with Fairbanks Scales in St. Johnsbury and will return to work.

Residents attending the City Council meeting in support of Keep BT Local. The council was unable to pick a buy for BT and instead asked the two finalist to pursue forming a joint venture.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

After deadlocking twice on the vote to select a buyer for Burlington Telecom, the City Council approved a resolution asking the two finalists to consider forming a joint venture.

Brave Little State
Aaron Shrewsbury

Brave Little State is working on an episode about Vermonters who work multiple jobs — if that’s you, we want to hear from you.

About half the artwork at the Lyndonville Art Walk includes images of crows. The call to artists stated, "Jeezum Crow, it's November!" and encouraged entries around that theme.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Fifty artists, most of them local, contributed work to a month-long art exhibit in ten businesses and empty storefronts throughout Lyndonville in the hopes of inspiring others to invest in the village.

Burlington City Councilor Karen Paul is quitting her job as a staff accountant so she can participate in the vote to select a buyer for the city’s telecom company.

btgbtg / iStock.com

We aren't endorsing it, but ... if Vermont did manage to secede from the United States, how would we fare?

House Speaker Mitzi Johnson, center, says Vermont lawmakers will consider numerous bills next year that would give Vermonters more recourse when their personal data is hacked.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Vermont lawmakers say they’ll try to put new safeguards on residents’ personal data in the next session, after the massive security breach at Equifax earlier this year.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A new report says the Southeast State Correctional Facility in Windsor could be used for transitional housing for inmates from around the state who have served out their terms but who can't find a place to live in Vermont's tight housing market.

The Burlington City Council voted to postpone their vote to select the buyer for Burlington Telecom. The council will take up the issue in a week.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

After a four and a half hour meeting, the Burlington City Council decided to postpone selecting a buyer for Burlington Telecom.

Hailshadow / iStock

A new report finds that the number of people who receive Social Security Disability Insurance, or SSDI, due to mental illness has been increasing.

In Burlington, the next operator of the city's municipal telecom company could be chosen tonight.

There are two finalists looking to buy Burlington Telecom: Tucows, a Toronto-based company and Keep BT Local – a cooperative formed with the purpose of buying Burlington Telecom.

In this file photo from 2014, signs are seen in the office of Mike Spillane of IBEW that describe past labor actions. On this "Vermont Edition," we're talking about the state's labor history and unions today.
Steve Zind / VPR File

Roughly one in 10 employed Vermonters belong to a union, and nearly half of those jobs are in public sectors like government and teaching. The role of organized labor has changed dramatically in recent decades, with union jobs declining in Vermont and nationwide. But organized labor, and how employers have responded to it, has profoundly shaped Vermont's history and culture.

Ryan Christiansen of Caledonia Spirits, Ben Whitcomb of the North Williston Cattle Company, Lisa Lorimer, former owner of the Vermont Bread Company, Allison Hooper, former owner of Vermont Creamery and Charles Storey of Harpoon Brewery spoke on a panel.
Nina Keck / vpr

Nearly a third of Vermont farms are run by someone over age 65, and according to a recent study by Land for Good, 91 percent of them don’t have someone younger ready to take over.

Joe Giancola, a prominent Rutland developer shakes hands with R. John Mitchell in front of former headquarters of the Rutland Herald. The Mitchell family owned the newspaper and the building that housed it for decades.
Nina Keck / VPR

Long time Rutland Developer Joe Giancola was the high bidder Friday morning when the historic headquarters of the Rutland Herald and several adjoining properties were auctioned off for $600,000 dollars.

Democratic lawmakers say they have a plan to avoid a government shutdown, in the event they can't reach a deal with Gov. Phil Scott over property taxes. But Scott says he needs to see more details.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

The idea of a tax on gasoline and heating oil is politically fraught, to say the least, but one Vermont business group says it’s time for elected officials to embrace the carbon tax.

John Cotter, Margaret Cheney and Tom Knauer, from left, of the Public Utility Commission. On Thursday, a legislative panel approved the commission's proposal for stricter sound limits for wind turbines.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

In approving stricter sound limits for ridgeline wind turbines Thursday afternoon, the Legislative Committee on Administrative Rules has managed to upset both sides on the wind energy debate.

A recent review of public retirement and healthcare plans by Pew Charitable Trusts shows that many U.S. jurisdictions are on an unsustainable path.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Two Townshend doctors are changing their practice over to a direct primary care model, where patients will pay a flat monthly fee for unlimited primary care. The Vermont doctors hope it will address the challenges of a changing health care insurance industry.

Mike Stewart / AP

Millions of Americans were only vaguely aware of the credit bureau Equifax until earlier this month, when the company revealed that the personal data of more than 147 million people was exposed in a massive data hack.

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