Vermont Edition

Voters filled booths in Norwich in 2016.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Next Tuesday voters will select the major-party candidates for statewide, legislative and county offices. We're hosting a reporter roundtable looking at the candidates and issues of these races, including the gubernatorial primaries, as well as the primaries for Vermont’s U.S. House and Senate seat that are up for election this year.

Clockwise from top left: James Ehlers, Christine Hallquist, Brenda Siegel and Ethan Sonneborn
Clockwise from top left: Peter Hirschfeld, VPR; courtesy of Hallquist campaign; courtesy of Siegel campaign; courtesy of Sonneborn campaign

Vermont Edition continues our series of live debates with candidates for selected statewide and federal office with the Democratic candidates for governor: James Ehlers, Christine Hallquist, Brenda Siegel and Ethan Sonneborn.

Vermont Yankee employees move the last of the plant's spent nuclear fuel into storage casks.
Courtesy / Entergy

Four years after the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant shut down, the last of its spent nuclear waste has been sealed away in storage casks and sent to a new facility near the Connecticut River.

VPR's John Dillon reported on the spent fuel transfer and talked about it with Vermont Edition.

Hackers are getting increasingly sophisticated in their methods for going after your information and money.
Ijubaphoto / iStock

Hackers going after your personal data are getting more and more sophisticated. That means it's no longer enough just to steer clear of suspicious emails that claim to be from wealthy Nigerian princes. We're talking with cybersecurity experts about how to stay a step ahead of phishing, ransomware and other attempts to break down your digital defenses.

Challengers Dan Freilich, left, and Ben Mitchell, center, will debate incumbent Rep. Peter Welch in the Democratic primary for Vermont's sole seat in the U.S. House.
Freilich campaign / DEBORAHANNE MAYER courtesy Mitchell campaign / Liam Elder Conners, VPR file

Three candidates are running to be the Democratic nominee for Vermont's only seat in the U.S. House. As part of VPR's coverage of contested statewide and federal races, Vermont Edition hosts a debate between Dan Freilich, Ben Mitchell and incumbent Rep. Peter Welch.

Gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi offers advice on battling bugs, harvesting your bounty and planting for fall.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

What a wonderful time to be a gardener: summer, when all that prep work and planting from earlier in the year turns into ripe veggies and flowers. But it might also be the time of year when you need the most advice from a gardening expert.

"Skip To The End" is the latest graphic novel written by Middlebury author Jeremy Holt.
Insight Comics / Justion Holt courtesy Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Music has the power to transport listeners across time, evoking memories of the past and whisking the listener back to a different age and place.

In his new graphic novel Skip To The End, Middlebury author Jeremy Holt explores how the right piece of music can take a listener back to their youth, to what they were wearing, who they were in love with. And maybe to just moments before something went wrong. 

We're looking  at the debates around how much independence to allow to kids.
_jure / iStock

Are today's parents overprotecting their kids and setting them up for failure? Or just keeping them safe? We're talking about the tricky balancing act between independence and safety, and what it means for kids’ development. 

Vermont State Parks' Rebecca Roy gave VPR's Mary Engisch a night tour of Burton Island.
Mary Engisch / VPR

Since the 18th century, Burton has been used as pasture for sheep and cows, and as farmland growing beans and peas. Now, the park is home to more than a dozen campsites and twice as many lean-tos, in addition to cabins, a bistro and even a 100-slip marina.

Incumbent Gov. Phil Scott, left, and primary challenger Keith Stern debate their case to be the Republican candidate for governor.
VPR file

We're beginning our series of live debates for selected statewide and federal offices with the Republican candidates for governor: incumbent Gov. Phil Scott and challenger Keith Stern.

The Berlin Mall is working on a revitalization project to better serve the community.
Kyle Martel / KSE Partners, LLP

The age of malls seems to have passed. But what do you do to enliven or rejuvenate malls that are still in place? They represent an incredible investment in real estate, usually in a prime location with excellent access. Berlin has one of Vermont's few malls and it is undertaking a plan called the HUB Project to make the mall relevant again and serve the community. 

The Coventry landfill is in the process of approving a 51 acre expansion.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

When you throw away a piece of garbage, where does it end up? On a compost pile? Recycled into a new object ready to use again? Or decomposing in a landfill? Vermont has many different ways of handling its waste, but with the state's only landfill at near capacity, it's worth reviewing just where our trash goes when we're done with it.

Eugene Jarecki's new documentary is "The King."
Eugene Jarecki, courtesy

Eugene Jarecki is an Emmy Award- and Peabody Award-winning documentary filmmaker who has looked at America from many different angles. His latest work, The King, unpacks the American dream through a road trip visiting key sites from the life of Elvis Presley. We're talking to Jarecki about Elvis, music, culture and where he sees the country going.

A vehicle in Canada waits for a gate to rise while crossing into Derby Line, Vermont from Stanstead, Quebec in July 2018.
Charles Krupa / AP

Arrests of immigrants attempting to cross the Canadian-Vermont border have more than doubled this year, with most of those arrests coming from people trying to enter the U.S. illegally, according to reporter Elizabeth Hewitt's story with VTDigger

An illustration of people with speech bubbles featuring question marks above them.
Sapunkele / iStock

Vermont's 2018 primary election is being held Tuesday, Aug. 14. Ahead of that date, Vermont Edition will host a series of three debates featuring gubernatorial and U.S. House candidates — and we'd like to know what you want to ask the candidates.

Anya Tynio is one of two Republicans vying for the GOP nomination for Vermont's seat in the U.S. House.
Matthew Smith / VPR

Anya Tynio is one of two candidates in the Republican primary for the U.S. House seat currently held by Peter Welch. Vermont Edition spoke to her about her run, her support for President Trump and where she stands on issues including immigration, tariffs, gun control and health care.

Author Rick Winston's book "Red Scare In The Green Mountains" looks at the era of McCarthyism in Vermont from 1946 through 1960.
Rootstock Publishing, courtesy

Blacklists and attacks on the free press. Intolerance and fear used for political gain. The Red Scare and anti-communist McCarthyism flourished across America—and Vermont—in the 1940s and 50s. We're talking with author Rick Winston about his new book looking at instances of "red scare" and "red-baiting" in Vermont.

Dr. Paul Seward has written a new book about his long career as an emergency room physician.
jazzIRT / iStock

Doctors have been providing emergency care for patients for as long as there have been doctors. But emergency medicine as a specialty is a relatively new development. On this Vermont Edition, we're talking to Dr. Paul Seward, one of the first physicians to specialize in emergency medicine.

The Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program office in Colchester requires overseas health screenings before refugees arrive in the U.S., but increasing rates of suicide among resettled Bhutanese refugees is alarming health officials.
Meg Malone / VPR

More than 92,000 Bhutanese refugees now live in the U.S., relocated after enduring years of deplorable and often deadly conditions in refugee camps after being expelled from their home country. Now, federal health officials have tracked a troubling trend among this group of New Americans: a rate of death by suicide nearly twice the national average. And Vermont's 2,500 Bhutanese refugees are not immune. 

According to a 1996 sudy, students lose an average of two months worth of knowledge over summer break every year.
Baona / iStock

Anyone who's been through school remembers the glory of summer vacation -- and the blues of the following fall. Well that slow return to school is actually a documented phenomenon with a name: the "summer slide."

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