Vermont Edition

Granite, seen here at the Rock of Ages quarry in Barre, is one of Vermont's three state rocks, along with marble and slate.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Vermont has three state rocks — and with good reason. Granite, marble and slate have done a lot to shape the state economically, environmentally and demographically. On this Vermont Edition, we dig into how and why that happened.

Vermont lawmakers are creating a way to import cheaper prescription drugs from Canada. But how will the system ultimately work?
eyegelb / iStock

Vermont is embarking on an ambitious experiment to bring down the high cost of prescription drugs by importing cheaper medications from Canada. State lawmakers and the governor passed the proposal into law in mid-May, but the details - and federal approval - still need to be worked out. How will the plan actually work?

Sen. Bernie Sanders talks on his phone as he departs after a vote on Gina Haspel to be CIA director, on Capitol Hill, Thursday, May 17, 2018 in Washington.
Alex Brandon / AP

After months of speculation, Sen. Bernie Sanders made it official this week that he will be seeking a third term in November. He also plans to campaign this summer and fall for progressive candidates across the country. And the rumors are swirling about another Sanders run for President in 2020. 

Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman is calling on Gov. Phil Scott to compromise on his "no new taxes" pledge to help facilitate a compromise at the Statehouse
Angela Evancie / VPR File

Will Gov. Phil Scott and legislative leaders be able to reach an agreement on property taxes and next year's state budget?

We're talking with Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman about efforts to find a way forward before state government might have to be shut down on July 1.

Gov. Phil Scott called a special session, which started this week, after vowing to veto the state budget passed by lawmakers.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

The acrimony in Montpelier has been clear for weeks as Gov. Phil Scott stuck to his promise not to sign the budget passed by lawmakers. Now elected officials are back in Montpelier for a special session to resolve the budget impasse, but with familiar arguments on both sides of the divide, are they any closer to an agreement?

"Vermont Edition" hears from agencies that prepare individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder for a career.
wildpixel / iStock

According to the CDC, about one child in 60 is identified with Autism Spectrum Disorder or ASD. We'll discuss the unique challenges individuals with ASD face as they enter the workforce after graduating from high school and college.

Meb Keflezighi won the Boston Marathon men's race in 2014. Now, he's running on a relay team at the Vermont City Marathon.
Charles Krupa / AP

This weekend, the streets of Burlington will be flooded with runners and spectators in town for the 30th year of the Vermont City Marathon. Among the 8,000 competitors on Sunday will be running royalty: Olympic Silver medalist and winner of both the New York and Boston marathons, Meb Keflezighi.

Author Loung Ung, right, talks with "Vermont Edition" host Jane Lindholm before the students in Essex High School's Global Leadership Program.
Anna Ste. Marie / VPR

Author Loung Ung was just five years old when communist revolutionaries known as the Khmer Rouge took control of her home country of Cambodia. Nearly a quarter of the population died in the ensuing genocide. But she survived, eventually making her way to Vermont. She recently returned to her alma mater to speak with students as part of Essex High School's Global Leadership Program. 

Reeve Lindbergh's new book "Two Lives" explores her own experiences against the background of growing up with some of the most famous parents in the country.
courtesy of Reeve Lindbergh

Reeve Lindbergh grew up in the long shadow cast by her parents, Anne and Charles Lindbergh.

Her father’s feats as an aviator made him one of the best-known people of his time, and the kidnapping and death of the Lindbergh’s infant son in 1932 only increased the family’s notoriety. Later, Charles became a leader in the non-interventionist movement before World War II, the original America First Committee.

A homeless encampment on Sears Lane in Burlington was taken down by the city last October.
Liam Connors / VPR

After last year's big debate over homelessness and violence in Vermont's largest city, Burlington officials planned to change their approach on the issue, with more emphasis on supporting the homeless community.

The winter temperatures seem to have finally abated, so it's time to get planting with help from gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi.
KenWiedemann / iStock

It's been a long cold winter followed by a funky spring. And your trees and shrubs really felt the effects. Luckily, we have gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi to help us segue successfully into summer with our gardens intact.

Ray Vega takes over as the host of VPR's Friday Night Jazz on May 18.
Seth Cashman / Courtesy

Ray Vega is a senior lecturer at the University of Vermont, where he teaches jazz history, directs three jazz combos and heads up the jazz trumpet studio. He's a trumpeter, percussionist, composer and arranger, who has worked with some of the biggest names in jazz and Latin music. He's now added "radio host" to his busy schedule as he takes over the reins of VPR's Friday Night Jazz.

Gov. Phil Scott has called for a special session to resolve the budget standoff in Montpelier.
John Dillon / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott has called lawmakers back to Montpelier for a special session next week to resolve the standoff over the state budget and property tax rates. We're convening a roundtable of political reporters to discuss what might happen next.

The Project ECHO telemedicine program lets teams of specialists work with primary care physicians to bring their expertise to patients in rural areas.
Intel Free Press / Wikimedia

Patients in rural Vermont seeking treatment for pain often face time-consuming travel to large regional hospitals and long wait times to see specialists. Now UVM's medical school is using a new telemedicine program to connect those specialists with primary care practitioners in rural areas to help patients get better care more quickly.

Social Security can provide a nest egg for retirement, but is it enough? We'll explore questions about Social Security, including deciding when to take it.
DNY59 / iStock

The great thing about life is that you get choices. But some of them aren't easy to make, like deciding the right age at which to start taking your Social Security payments from the government. We'll help you navigate that tricky decision.

Lawmakers gathered in the Senate at the kickoff of the biennium in 2017. Now, lawmakers will return for a special session next week.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

Lawmakers and the Scott administration remain in a standoff after the state budget was passed with broad support from the legislature. Now, the governor has said he will call lawmakers back to a special session next week. VPR's Peter Hirschfeld joined Vermont Edition to talk about what happens next in Montpelier.

Marijuana seeds (left), a young marijuana plant (center), and a mature flowering marijuana plant. Cultivating a limited number of mature plants will be legal in Vermont on July 1, but getting started raises legal questions.
Wikimedia

Starting July 1, Vermonters 21 and older can legally posses an ounce of marijuana and cultivate a small number of the plants. But marijuana sales and distribution remain illegal under state law, so if you're interested, how can you get the seeds to get started? We're talking about how to legally start growing under Vermont's marijuana laws.

The minimum wage bill passed by the legislature would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024. The current minimum wage is $10.50 an hour.
Photo by Angela Evancie, illustration by Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

The Vermont legislature has passed a bill that would raise the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024. But Gov. Scott has opposed the legislation and it's a target for a veto. We're talking about what's in the bill and the debate over how it would impact the state's businesses and low-income workers.

Matt Lloyd is scheduled to donate a kidney to his wife, Brandi, who has a genetic condition that leads to kidney failure.
Courtesy Brandi and Matt Lloyd

Tuesday, May 15, 2018, is a day that Brandi and Matt Lloyd have been waiting for a long time.

That's the day the couple, from Mooers, New York, are scheduled to undergo surgery. Matt will go first and have one of his kidneys removed. Then Brandi's surgery will follow.

Her diseased kidneys will be removed and Matt's donor kidney will be placed in her body. If all goes well, they should each have one functioning kidney by the end of the day and be on their way to recovery.

An impasse on Gov. Scott's education plan could lead to the calling of a special legislative session.
Meg Malone / VPR FILE

Strong disagreements between Gov. Phil Scott and legislative leaders in Montpelier mean that the future of the budget, and many other bills at the Statehouse, is still very much up in the air. So where is all of this headed?

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