Vermont Supreme Court

Gregory Zullo, center, at the Vermont Supreme Court Wednesday.
Henry Epp / VPR

Attorneys made arguments Wednesday before Vermont's highest court in a case involving a traffic stop that allegedly stemmed from racial profiling.

The Vermont Supreme Court building in Montpelier turns 100 years old this year.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

This year, the building that holds the Vermont Supreme Court turns 100. On Friday, state officials will celebrate that anniversary.

The Vermont Supreme Court. The Vermont Supreme Court overturned the conviction of a man who left KKK recruitment flyers at the Burlington homes of two women of color. The court said the state failed to prove the action constituted an immediate threat.
John Dillon / VPR File

Last week, the court overturned the conviction of a man who put Ku Klux Klan flyers on the Burlington homes of two women of color. The court said the state didn’t prove the action met the threshold of ‘threatening behavior.’

18-year-old Jack Sawyer, of Poultney, enters Rutland Superior Court on Tuesday afternoon wearing handcuffs.
Glenn Russell / Burlington Free Press / Pool

An 18-year-old Poultney man, accused of plotting a thwarted school shooting earlier this year, cannot be held without bail, according to a decision by the Vermont Supreme Court Wednesday.

Vermont Supreme Court in Montpelier.
Lillian Kate Alfin Johnson / VPR/file

At first glance, the numbers look optimistic. After three years of increases in family court cases related to addiction such as child abuse and neglect, numbers were down for fiscal year 2017.

Ben Scotch with his wife, Barbara, in 2017.
Provided by the family

Benson Scotch of Montpelier — a lifelong champion of the law, the arts and civil rights and liberties — has died at 83.

The Vermont Supreme Court. The Vermont Supreme Court overturned the conviction of a man who left KKK recruitment flyers at the Burlington homes of two women of color. The court said the state failed to prove the action constituted an immediate threat.
John Dillon / VPR File

Who is legally recognized as a parent? That's the question at the heart of a recent Vermont Supreme Court decision that a family law expert says exposes the gaps in Vermont's laws that affect modern families.

The Vermont Supreme Court ruled that records of public business conducted on private email accounts are subject to the state's public records law.
Royalbroil / Wikimedia Commons

Vermont's Supreme Court ruled Friday that all records generated by public officials as they do their jobs are open to the public, regardless of where the record is stored.

Vermont Supreme Court Chief Justice Paul Reiber says the state's legal system should be availale to everyone who lives here regardless of their legal status.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

Vermont Supreme Court Chief Justice Paul Reiber is hoping to reach an agreement with federal immigration officials that would allow undocumented workers to access the state's legal system without the fear of being arrested.

Free speech versus disorderly conduct was one of several issues presented in front of the Supreme Court of Vermont at the Vermont Law School on Wednesday.

Gov. Phil Scott says he hasn’t even looked at the list of six names sent to Gov. Peter Shumlin last month as possible replacements for outgoing Supreme Court Justice John Dooley. But Scott says he wants to start the nomination process from scratch nonetheless.

Stefan Hard / Times Argus/Pool

Shortly after Gov. Peter Shumlin delivered his farewell address to the state Legislature Wednesday, the Vermont Supreme Court unanimously ruled that he could not appoint a successor to Associate Supreme Court Justice John Dooley.

Stefan Hard / Times Argus/Pool

In a unanimous ruling that could impact its own make up, the Vermont Supreme Court on Wednesday issued a ruling that denies Gov. Peter Shumlin the ability to appoint a successor to outgoing Associate Justice John Dooley.

Stefan Hard / Times Argus/Pool

An overflow crowd descended on the Vermont Supreme Court Tuesday afternoon for a hearing that could have ramifications on gubernatorial appointments for years to come. 

Taylor Dobbs / VPR/file

A very unusual legal case will be decided in Montpelier Tuesday. The Vermont Supreme Court will hold a special hearing to determine whether Gov. Peter Shumlin has the authority to appoint a new member to the court.

Gov. Peter Shumlin is defending his decision to fill a vacancy on the Vermont Supreme Court, a vacancy that will occur after he leaves office.  Longtime Vermont Supreme Court Justice John Dooley announced last week that he will step down from the court in March.

A Brattleboro Retreat sign.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

A ruling by the Vermont Supreme Court could change the legal landscape for mental health care in Vermont. The high court ruled that mental health professionals should provide more information about potentially dangerous patients who are leaving treatment.

Vermont Law School sign on a fall day in October 2012.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press FIle

The Vermont Supreme Court is considering whether a prison inmate who helped other prisoners with their court cases was practicing law without a license. The state thinks so and is pursuing criminal charges against the inmate.

Some of the decisions issued by the Vermont Supreme Court can be a little ... well, boring. But what if there was somebody to explain the idea of "legal indemnification" as two buddies arguing over a dinner tab? Or if you could have a caricature of Yosemite Sam walk you through the ins and outs of Vermont's Professional Responsibility Board? 

The Vermont Supreme Court has ruled the state can't collect DNA evidence from suspects in criminal cases unless they've been convicted of a felony.

In a 3-2 decision issued Friday, the court ruled a state law that allowed for the collection of DNA from people charged with felonies after a court decided there was probable cause violated the Vermont constitution.

  Three years ago, Vermont's DNA database law was expanded to include people charged with felonies. Five Vermont trial courts have ruled the law unconstitutional.

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