VPR In Jordan

Refugee families from Syria, the first of about a hundred individuals who might be resettled in Rutland in the coming year, have begun to arrive. But millions of other displaced Syrians remain behind while they await security approval to be resettled in another country.

VPR's Nina Keck on the job in Jordan, January 2017.
Credit courtesy, Nina Keck / VPR

VPR's Nina Keck spent a week in Jordan to report on what life is like for the Syrian refugees awaiting resettlement, the process they have to go through and the impact they’re having on their host country.

VPR's reporting from Jordan on the refugee crisis is supported in part by the VPR Journalism Fund.

Nina Keck / VPR

Nearly 5 million Syrian refugees have fled to nearby countries like such as Jordan, Turkey, Lebanon, Iraq and Egypt, according to the latest count by the United Nations. About three quarters of those Syrians are women and children.

Nina Keck / VPR

When I spent a week reporting in Amman, Jordan, on the Syrian refugee crisis, I was able to have remarkably candid interviews with Syrian families and Jordanians. But none of that would have been possible without help from my “fixer.”

Photo: Nina Keck; Illustration: Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

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Join us for drinks and conversation with VPR’s Nina Keck following her return from reporting on the refugee crisis in Jordan. From there she reported on what life is like for the Syrian refugees awaiting resettlement, the process they have to go through and the impact they’re having on their host country.

Nina Keck / VPR

People across Vermont and around the world have been transfixed by the immigration story that has unfolded in the last two weeks - and especially the impact on refugees. In the midst of it, VPR's Nina Keck was reporting on the Syrian refugee crisis from Jordan.

Nina Keck / VPR

Among the 650,000 Syrians who have sought safety in neighboring Jordan are farmers who had to leave their own land behind and who are now getting by as migrant farm workers.

Nina Keck / VPR

Reporter Nina Keck is in Jordan this week to report on what life is like for Syrian refugees awaiting resettlement. Along the way, Keck has bumped into Vermonters working to support them.

Nina Keck / VPR

President Trump’s executive order suspending refugee resettlement recently put the brakes on Rutland's plans to welcome 100 refugees. The policy change is impacting thousands of families, including the Alzoubanis, who were getting ready to move to Detroit, Michigan.

Nina Keck / VPR

About 8 miles from the Syrian border in Jordan is the world's second-largest refugee camp. The sprawling temporary city is home to about 80,000 Syrians who fled their country’s civil war.

As President Trump's executive order was sparking confusion in the U.S. this weekend, VPR's Nina Keck was on her way to Jordan, where many Syrian refugees are waiting to be resettled in the U.S. and elsewhere. 

Nina Keck / VPR

In the U.S., protests, confusion and anger have followed President Trump’s executive order that prevents new refugees from entering the country for 120 days, suspends resettlement for Syrians indefinitely and bars travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries for 90 days.

Raad Adayleh / AP

Refugee families from Syria, the first of about a hundred individuals who might be resettled in Rutland in the coming year, have begun to arrive. But millions of other displaced Syrians remain behind while they await security approval to be resettled in another country.