VPR News

Joe Gay - an engineer with Casella Waste Systems - stands before the Coventry landfill.
Jane Lindholm / VPR File

The Coventry landfill in northern Vermont will expand by 51 acres. The state issued a permit to the landfill's owners Friday after an extended public comment period.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has approved the license transfer for the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant.

Jess Weitz / Submitted

Nobody’s born a rock star.

Making the big time takes practice, commitment and a lot of good luck.

But in Brattleboro an annual youth rock festival is trying to help aspiring artists by giving teenage musicians a place to come together, learn a little bit, and rock out.

All F-35 fighter jets deployed to the U.S. and its allies have been temporarily grounded following a crash of one of the aircraft in South Carolina last month.

In a statement, the F-35 Joint Program Office said the U.S. and its international partners had suspended flights of the Joint Strike Fighter, also known as the Lightening II, until a fleet-wide inspection of the aircraft's fuel tubes is completed.

A number of states are blocking web traffic from foreign countries to their voter registration websites, making the process harder for some U.S. citizens who live overseas to vote, despite the practice providing no real security benefits.

A view of Lake Iroquois in Chittenden County, Vermont.
Hunter Hedenberg, Courtesy

State environmental officials have rejected a plan to use a powerful chemical herbicide to control an invasive water weed in Lake Iroquois in Chittenden County, saying the potential environmental damage did not justify its use.

The Green Mountain Byway, as established a decade ago, ran from Route 2 in Waterbury Village and up Route 100 through Stowe. Now the byway has been extended to include four more Lamoille County towns.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

As peak foliage colors spread across the Green Mountains, it’s not a bad time to go for a drive or a bike ride. One good route is the newly-expanded Green Mountain Byway.

With less than a month before election day, "Vermont Edition" looks at how the races are shaping up and what are the key issues.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press/File

In less than four weeks, Vermonters will choose candidates for statewide and legislative offices. Our panel of political pundits will look at the major issues in the campaigns for governor, lieutenant governor, U.S. Senate and U.S. House.

Discussing how these campaigns have unfolded this year are:

Democratic challenger Christine Hallquist and Republican incumbent Gov. Phil Scott argued over how best to lead Vermont Wednesday at Rutland's Paramount Theatre on stage.
Nina Keck / VPR

Vermont’s two major party gubernatorial candidates debated for the second time Wednesday night. This time they faced off in Rutland at an event hosted by VTDigger.

The Cambrian Rise Development in Burlington. Housing leaders announced Wednesday they were meeting overall housing production goals, but lagging behind on their goals to create more affordable housing.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

A campaign to boost construction of new homes in Chittenden County has had mixed results. The effort has resulted in an overall increase in housing stock, but the campaign is lagging behind on its goal to create more affordable housing.

The cover of Melanie Finn's novel "The Underneath" next to a photo of her in the woods.
From left: Two Dollar Radio / Libby March, Courtesy

The Northeast Kingdom is known for its pastoral beauty — but that’s only part of the view of the region presented in Melanie Finn’s latest novel, The Underneath. Her characters exist in the brutal underbelly of rural Vermont that’s ravaged by the opioid epidemic.

Two Townshend Elementary School students sit at a table.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

State government almost shut down earlier this year, and the fight was largely over education funding.

And all of those debates in Montpelier, and negotiations over taxes and education costs? They’re all rooted in the decisions that local school boards make around this time of year.

Christine Hallquist, the Democratic candidate for governor, outlines parts of her education platform in Burlington on Wednesday, stading behind a Christine for Vermont sign outside.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Christine Hallquist outlined some aspects of her education platform on Wednesday in Burlington, saying she supports a change in how public schools are funded.

Dr. Lorraine Sterritt at the VPR studios
Bayla Metzger / VPR

As of July, Saint Michael's College in Colchester has a new president: Dr. Lorraine Sterritt. She is the first woman to serve in that position in the school's history. 

Blue-green algae blooms, photographed in the summer of 2014 in Lake Champlain.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR FILE

Both of Vermont's major party gubernatorial candidates say they support a long-term plan to clean up Lake Champlain and other waterways in Vermont, but neither candidate is offering a plan to pay for it.

A display case with CBD products at the Green State Gardener store in Burlington.
Jon Kalish / For VPR

As the harvest nears a close, 2018 is turning out to be a pivotal year for industrial hemp in Vermont. More people are growing it than ever before and millions of dollars are being invested in hemp farms and in the industrial labs needed to extract CBD from hemp.

New laws in Europe and California are forcing tech companies to protect users' privacy or risk big fines.

Now, the industry is fearing that more states will enact tough restrictions. So it's moving to craft federal legislation that would pre-empt state laws and might put the Federal Trade Commission in charge of enforcement.

Europe enacted a tough law in May which requires, among other things, that companies make data breaches public within 72 hours of discovering them.

Russell Beste, an independent U.S. Senate candidate, at the VPR studios
Bayla Metzger / VPR

With the November midterm elections just weeks away, VPR is featuring interviews with candidates running for statewide office. Russell Beste is an independent candidate running for U.S. Senate. He’s challenging incumbent Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is seeking re-election.

Some of the world's top climate scientists have concluded that global warming is likely to reach dangerous levels unless new technologies are developed to remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says pledges from the world's governments to reduce greenhouse gases, made in Paris in 2015, aren't enough to keep global warming from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees F) above pre-industrial temperatures.

A small shovel in the dirt with bulbs and leaves on it.
onepony / iStock

If you love to garden, there's still plenty of time to dig in the dirt before the winter chill blows in. On this Vermont Edition, we have gardening expert and Vermont Garden Journal host Charlie Nardozzi ready to answer all your questions on fall gardening.

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