VPR News

The spent nuclear fuel at Vermont Yankee is being moved from the cooling pools, shown in this photo, into dry cask storage.
Toby Talbot / AP/file

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says a new dry cask storage facility at Vermont Yankee passed a federal inspection.

Rebecca Sananes / VPR/file

Seven Vermont counties hit by severe flooding earlier this summer will get federal assistance for storm clean up and infrastructure repairs.

A legislative committee has been meeting this summer to try to figure out how private schools that take public money should serve special education students.

All three members of Vermont's congressional delegation - Sen. Bernie Sanders, Rep. Peter Welch and Sen. Patrick Leahy - are critical of President Donald Trump's comments regarding the violence in Charlottesville, Va., this past weekend.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

The three members of Vermont's congressional delegation have criticized President Donald Trump for his comments about this past weekend's violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Since Vermont started collecting data in 1994 the number of domestic violence related homicides, as a percentage of all homicides, has been dropping.

Paul Costello, left, and Peter Walke, are co-chairs of the governor's Vermont Climate Action Commission, which met for the first time Tuesday. They say Vermont can use emissions-reduction initiatives to advance the state economy.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott’s newly minted Climate Action Commission held its first meeting Tuesday, and while past Vermont governors have also convened special panels to study the issue, commission members insist this latest one will deliver results.

After this past weekend's protests by white nationalist and neo-nazi groups in Charlottesville, Virginia, attention has turned to whether those groups exist here in Vermont.

St. Michael's College graduates Danny Divis, left, and Justin McKenzie, right, throw out first pitches at the Boston Red Sox's "Vermont Night" at Fenway Park on Aug. 5. The two hockey players were awarded the Hockey Humanitarian Award last spring.
Dan Brown / Kapitol Photography

Danny Divis and Justin McKenzie, recent St. Michael's College graduates who played on the hockey team, started the mental health awareness campaign Hope Happens Here while they were students. This past spring they were recognized with the Hockey Humanitarian Award, a national honor for collegiate athletes who give back to their community.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

After more than eight years, Vermont Public Radio's President and CEO Robin Turnau will be stepping down.

Vermont's shortage of primary care doctors will soon get worse because a number of them will retire in the next few years.
shironosov / iStock

Many states across the country have a need to attract more primary care physicians, but Vermont's situation has an additional twist - a sizeable number of the state's primary care doctors are expected to retire in the next few years.

A Canadian police officer warns a young man from Yemen that if he illegally crosses into Canada in between checkpoints he will be arrested. If he proves to not be a threat to the public, the officers will help him fill out the asylum request paperwork.
Kathleen Masterson / VPR

The number of asylum-seekers fleeing the U.S. into Canada is surging this summer, with nearly 800 people illegally walking into Quebec in June alone.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors hate groups in the country, lists one group in Burlington: The Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi website, that encouraged users to start regional forums for planning real life meet-ups.

Betty Smith Mastaler, seen here in 1978, talked to "Vermont Edition" recently about her first years at VPR and the state of the station.
VPR file

Aug. 13, 2017 marked Vermont Edition's 10th anniversary, and the 40th anniversary of Vermont Public Radio. To mark the occasion, we talked to someone who has been with the station for more than 40 years and has done a little bit of everything: Betty Smith Mastaler.

Nina Keck / VPR

Nearly 200 people gathered in Rutland Monday night to publicly condemn the racism and violence that erupted during Saturday’s white supremacists rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that left one woman dead and many others injured.

James Ehlers, seen here at a Statehouse rally earlier this year, says Vermont voters will appreciate a progressive agenda that includes a $15 minimum wage and tax increases on the wealthy.
Brenda Patoine, courtesy

The next gubernatorial election is still more than a year away, and it's been more than 50 years since an incumbent governor lost a reelection bid in Vermont. But the leading Democratic challenger to Gov. Phil Scott says he thinks the Republican incumbent is vulnerable.

A Vermont environmental advocacy group is joining a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over the agency's implementation of a law to evaluate potentially toxic chemicals.

The U.S. Department of Education says Vermont has to give more information about how the state will measure student progress under the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA.

Pat Embree of Rutland is one of more than 4,700 Vermonter seniors who receive home delivered food with Meals on Wheels.
Nina Keck / VPR

Meals on Wheels brings nutritious food to more than 15,000 Vermonters a year, most of them over age 60.

Nationally, data show the program saves lives and billions of dollars a year in health care spending. Yet increasing demand on top of funding shortfalls are forcing program administrators across Vermont to make tough choices.

EclipseSundial.com creators Dan Axtell (left) and Bill Gotesman pose at the Burlington Earth Clock, along the bike path. Gottesman also designed the sundial at the center of the stone circle.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

On August 21, the entire North American continent will witness a full or partial eclipse of the sun. And a couple of Vermonters have come up with an activity that anyone can do to tell time as they follow the eclipse’s progress.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders will introduce a bill next month to create a government-run, single-payer health care system. And he knows it's going to fail.

"Look, I have no illusions that under a Republican Senate and a very right-wing House and an extremely right-wing president of the United States, that suddenly we're going to see a Medicare-for-all, single-payer passed," he said recently, sitting in his Senate office. "You're not going to see it. That's obvious."

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