Water Quality

As top environmental officials from Quebec and New York looked on, Gov. Phil Scott signed a letter committing to reduce pollution in Lake Champlain as part of an inter-state and international effort.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Officials from Vermont, New York, Quebec and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency all committed to combine their efforts to reduce pollution in Lake Champlain on Monday in the first updated pollution management plan since 2010.

Jim Wieck, far right, a hydrogeologist and senior project manager overseeing the Rennie Farm cleanup, talks to residents about the pump and treat system at the former Dartmouth College burial site.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

The remediation system cleaning up a Hanover neighborhood’s chemically contaminated groundwater appears to be working.

Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont wastewater plants along the Connecticut River are waiting to hear from the Environmental Protection Agency. Even without specifics, managers at the larger plants know they will be required to adjust the amount of nitrogen in their treated wastewater, considerably lowering the levels, potentially at a high cost.

By the end of the year, the Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce new limits on the amount of nitrogen that wastewater treatment plants in Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Hampshire can release into the Connecticut River.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

For the past few years, there has been a showdown over conflicting uses of central Vermont’s Berlin Pond. Now, state and local officials are working on finding a compromise.

Over 200 years ago, the Spitfire, a Revolutionary War-era gunship, sank to the bottom of Lake Champlain after being damaged during the Battle of Valcour Island. Now, researchers are proposing a plan to raise the ship, restore it and put it on display.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/File

A former regulator at the Environmental Protection Agency says budget cuts proposed by President Donald Trump would have a “devastating” impact on efforts to reduce the flow of pollution into Lake Champlain and other Vermont water bodies.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Bennington residents who have been dealing with contaminated water are starting to get frustrated with the state's ability to find a long-term solution to their problem.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR feil

The U.S. Supreme Court recently decided it will continue to hear a controversial case about which water bodies the Environmental Protection Agency can regulate, even after President Trump asked them to hold off. Vermont is one of eight states that has filed to defend the EPA rule.  

Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

April showers bring hundreds of thousands of gallons of untreated water into Lake Champlain, it turns out.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

As lawmakers look to defer again a politically difficult decision on how to pay for a $1 billion clean water initiative, advocates are ramping up pressure to adopt a financing plan before the 2017 legislative session adjourns.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

When it comes to bodies of water, your big boys in Vermont are Lake Champlain, Lake Memphremagog, and the Connecticut River. The rest of the state is pretty much in the watershed of these three. So when it comes to clean water, all of our waterways are interconnected.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Sen. Patrick Leahy denounced the president's budget priorities, which would cut funding to environment and health research programs in order to increase defense spending. Leahy says budget cuts at the Environmental Protection Agency would have a direct impact in Vermont.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

A key legislative committee is recommending $31 million in new taxes and fees annually to clean up Lake Champlain and other Vermont water bodies, prompting a swift rebuke from a Republican governor who says the “baffling” proposal will hurt businesses and “make Vermont less affordable.”

In the 1960s and 1970s, Dartmouth College buried lab animals, human tissues and other medical waste at Rennie Farm. Today some drinking water in the areas around Rennie Farm has been contaminated with 1,4 dioxane, a suspected carcinogen.

Sananes / VPR

This weekend, residents of a Hanover neighborhood near a Dartmouth College hazardous waste site went to check out a system designed to clean up their groundwater.

A lawyer involved with a class-action suit in Bennington says a $671 million settlement by the company that made PFOA highlights the dangers of the chemical.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As part of its most recent lawsuit against the State of Vermont, Saint-Gobain sent out sheriff's deputies to serve court papers to 17 people who live near the company's former factory.

Michel Euler / AP

Saint-Gobain, the company that owned the North Bennington factory that's suspected of polluting water in the area, has stepped up its legal battle against the state of Vermont.

Dartmouth College is implementing a program to protect property value in the Hanover neighborhood affected by a contamination caused by the school.

Jtasphoto / iStock

After the industrial chemical PFOA contaminated the drinking water of hundreds of people in southern Vermont, legislators wanted to avoid another surprise contamination. So last year, they tasked a working group to figure out how the state could more proactively regulate chemicals. Now the group is back with recommendations.

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