Water Quality

Sananes / VPR

This weekend, residents of a Hanover neighborhood near a Dartmouth College hazardous waste site went to check out a system designed to clean up their groundwater.

A lawyer involved with a class-action suit in Bennington says a $671 million settlement by the company that made PFOA highlights the dangers of the chemical.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As part of its most recent lawsuit against the State of Vermont, Saint-Gobain sent out sheriff's deputies to serve court papers to 17 people who live near the company's former factory.

Michel Euler / AP

Saint-Gobain, the company that owned the North Bennington factory that's suspected of polluting water in the area, has stepped up its legal battle against the state of Vermont.

Dartmouth College is implementing a program to protect property value in the Hanover neighborhood affected by a contamination caused by the school.

The Vermont Air National Guard announced it has discovered PFCs in a private water well near its airport base.
Jtasphoto / iStock

After the industrial chemical PFOA contaminated the drinking water of hundreds of people in southern Vermont, legislators wanted to avoid another surprise contamination. So last year, they tasked a working group to figure out how the state could more proactively regulate chemicals. Now the group is back with recommendations.

Residents of a Hanover neighborhood say they will be suing Dartmouth College in federal court over a contamination affecting their drinking water.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont's Health Commissioner says people in Bennington who consumed water with the industrial chemical PFOA have detectable levels of the chemical in their bodies.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

A plan to fund water-quality improvements by assessing a per-parcel fee on all property owners in Vermont is already drawing opposition in Montpelier.

Photo courtesy Lake Champlain Basin Program

One-point-three billion dollars. That's the total amount the state thinks it needs to clean up Lake Champlain and other waterways over the next 20 years.  So where does the money come from? The Treasurer's Office has just released a report that maps out how to raise most of that funding.

The Scott administration wants to reallocation existing revenues to pay for clean water initiatives, but lawmakers are worried the plan could shortchange other state programs.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/File

If lawmakers go along with the recommendations outlined in a long-awaited report released late Sunday night, then property owners across Vermont will pick up much of the tab for a water-quality improvement initiative expected to cost almost $1 billion over the next 20 years.

Clockwise from top left: Lisa Rathke, AP; Andy Duback, AP; Nina Keck, VPR; Jacquelyn Martin, AP; Angela Evancie, VPR.

It's been quite a year. In the final days of 2016, we're reflecting on some of the biggest news stories of the year and looking toward what's next in 2017.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The president of Saint-Gobain says his company might not be responsible for the water contamination in Bennington County.

Officials lifted a boil water notice Friday morning for the towns of Addison, Bridport and Shoreham. The Tri-Town water system's 1,600 customers were advised to boil their water on Monday, Dec. 19 after three separate incidents led officials to believe the system may have been contaminated by groundwater.

Governor-elect Phil Scott says he'll continue the work of the outgoing Shumlin administration to reach a settlement with the company that contaminated drinking water in Bennington County.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

The incoming leader of Vermont's environmental agency says there is one factor that has made water quality issues more complicated over the years: climate change.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR file

A legislative committee has permanently set Vermont's safe drinking water standard for the chemicals PFOA and PFOS at 20 parts per trillion.

Environmental watchdogs say they’re heartened by Governor-elect Phil Scott’s pick to lead the Agency of Natural Resources, but that it’s too early to discern whether the incoming Republican administration is serious about cleaning up Lake Champlain and tackling some of the other major environmental issues facing Vermont.

The Scott administration wants to reallocation existing revenues to pay for clean water initiatives, but lawmakers are worried the plan could shortchange other state programs.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/File

Next month, Vermont Treasurer Beth Pearce will unveil a much-anticipated legislative report that will tell lawmakers how to raise the $1.3 billion needed to clean up Lake Champlain and other polluted waterways. And Governor-elect Phil Scott may soon find himself at odds with Democrats — and environmental advocates — over how to come up with the money.

The Department of Environmental Conservation has uncovered new sources of PFOA and PFOS, two hazardous chemicals that were used in manufacturing.

Pages