Weather

Workers from Stowe Electric tend to damage from a fallen tree on Moscow Road Tuesday. Utility officials say the scope of the damage from Sunday's storm has complicated recovery efforts.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Tens of thousands of Vermonters moved into their second day without electricity Tuesday, and utilities say it could be days until they restore power to everyone.

VPR/Steve Zind / VPR

After heavy rains the past few days, the northern halves of Vermont, New Hampshire, and part of northern New York are under a flash flood watch through tomorrow. A stretch of the Winooski River is under a flood warning as of Friday afternoon, and more rain is in the forecast.

A double rainbow appears in the sky during an evening rain shower in Norwich in early June.
Angela Evancie / VPR

You waited all winter to plant those tomatoes, fresh herbs and flowering shrubs. Now, if only the weather would cooperate, right?  

Robert Layman / The Rutland Herald

In south-central Vermont, especially around Rutland, a severe windstorm swept through last Friday, knocking down trees and leaving many without electricity.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

April showers bring hundreds of thousands of gallons of untreated water into Lake Champlain, it turns out.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The Hunger Mountain Children’s Center in Waterbury is celebrating a move back into its newly renovated space. The center was forced to relocate after Tropical Storm Irene and, as it turns out, it’s one of the town's last remaining Irene recovery projects.

Heavy equipment used for the snow removal effort made its way down North Winooski Street in Burlington Wednesday morning.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

The National Weather Service's Burlington office says the storm that hit Tuesday through Wednesday is the second-biggest snowstorm to hit the state, with snowfall totals just shy of 30 inches reported in Burlington.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Lake Champlain water levels approached record lows this summer, which exposed acres of beach sand that would normally be underwater.  This allowed some rare — and a few endangered— species of sand-dwelling grass plants to blossom, some of which may have lain dormant for decades.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Just three years ago, the state spent more than $4.5 million on emergency housing for the homeless. Since then, there's been a shift toward investing in warming shelters, and other programs in communities around the state.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

A lack of summer rains has some municipal water system operators worried about their systems running dry. And a few towns are taking steps to lower consumption until we get more rain.

The Cambridge village of Jeffersonville is asking water customers to conserve water until further notice. The spring-fed system is running low due to drought conditions.

Dieu Nalio Chery / AP

Following the destruction and torrential flooding in Haiti from Hurricane Matthew, a Rutland-based nonprofit is ramping up its efforts there to provide clean water.

AP Photo

On September 21, 1938, a hurricane slammed into New England killing hundreds and devastating the region. The storm pre-dated accurate weather forecasting, and left long-lasting effects on the region's economy, landscape and psyche.

When people hear the word drought, they likely think of California. But there's also an extreme drought in parts of New England. The Northeast is experiencing the worst drought in more than a decade.

Collecting daily precipitation data is the goal of a group of volunteers paying close attention to the weather. Jay Shafer, a professor of atmospheric sciences at Lyndon State College, spoke to Vermont Edition on Monday about the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, or CoCoRaHS.

The weather in Vermont this summer has been volatile – hot and muggy, then pouring rain. We've already experienced several over 90 degree days in parts of the state.

Andrew Loconto, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Burlington, joined Vermont Edition to talk about the recent weather conditions, as well as what we typically experience during Vermont summers.

Christopher Middings / via Flickr

Modern life is hectic and stressful, and it can be hard to adhere to that old adage about taking time to stop and smell the roses. But as loyal readers of the Rutland Herald are reminded each year, it is definitely worth it to stop and smell the lilacs.

Patti Daniels / VPR

 


People's United Bank Vermont City Marathon officials activated detailed emergency plans during Sunday's race in response to extreme weather conditions, ending the race just four hours after it began in downtown Burlington.

The Vermont Electric Power Company – the state’s transmission utility – says it’s using an extremely accurate weather forecasting system to better predict storm events. And VELCO CEO Tom Dunn says the technology will also lead to more effective use of renewable energy.

Courtesy of Nancy Hogue

Author Steve Long was our guest recently to discuss his new book about a devastating storm in New England history. On September 21, 1938, a hurricane slammed into New England killing hundreds and causing long-lasting effects on the economy and the landscape itself.

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