Weather

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Just three years ago, the state spent more than $4.5 million on emergency housing for the homeless. Since then, there's been a shift toward investing in warming shelters, and other programs in communities around the state.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

A lack of summer rains has some municipal water system operators worried about their systems running dry. And a few towns are taking steps to lower consumption until we get more rain.

The Cambridge village of Jeffersonville is asking water customers to conserve water until further notice. The spring-fed system is running low due to drought conditions.

Dieu Nalio Chery / AP

Following the destruction and torrential flooding in Haiti from Hurricane Matthew, a Rutland-based nonprofit is ramping up its efforts there to provide clean water.

AP Photo

On September 21, 1938, a hurricane slammed into New England killing hundreds and devastating the region. The storm pre-dated accurate weather forecasting, and left long-lasting effects on the region's economy, landscape and psyche.

When people hear the word drought, they likely think of California. But there's also an extreme drought in parts of New England. The Northeast is experiencing the worst drought in more than a decade.

Collecting daily precipitation data is the goal of a group of volunteers paying close attention to the weather. Jay Shafer, a professor of atmospheric sciences at Lyndon State College, spoke to Vermont Edition on Monday about the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, or CoCoRaHS.

The weather in Vermont this summer has been volatile – hot and muggy, then pouring rain. We've already experienced several over 90 degree days in parts of the state.

Andrew Loconto, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Burlington, joined Vermont Edition to talk about the recent weather conditions, as well as what we typically experience during Vermont summers.

Christopher Middings / via Flickr

Modern life is hectic and stressful, and it can be hard to adhere to that old adage about taking time to stop and smell the roses. But as loyal readers of the Rutland Herald are reminded each year, it is definitely worth it to stop and smell the lilacs.

Patti Daniels / VPR

 


People's United Bank Vermont City Marathon officials activated detailed emergency plans during Sunday's race in response to extreme weather conditions, ending the race just four hours after it began in downtown Burlington.

The Vermont Electric Power Company – the state’s transmission utility – says it’s using an extremely accurate weather forecasting system to better predict storm events. And VELCO CEO Tom Dunn says the technology will also lead to more effective use of renewable energy.

Courtesy of Nancy Hogue

Author Steve Long was our guest recently to discuss his new book about a devastating storm in New England history. On September 21, 1938, a hurricane slammed into New England killing hundreds and causing long-lasting effects on the economy and the landscape itself.

Dan Noyes / Courtesy

About two dozen residents of a mobile home park in Lyndonville were evacuated today as flooding closed state and local roads in a number of locations.  

redlegsfan21 / Wikimedia Commons

With winter tourism suffering due to a lack of snow, you might think fewer people would be flying into Vermont. But officials at many regional airports say business is up.

PutneyPics / Flickr

Weather forecasters are looking ahead to a cold and snowy week. It's a turnaround from the relatively warm and snow-free weather we've seen across the state this winter. We're looking at how this winter's weird weather has been affecting the state's economy- from tourism and the ski slopes to heating costs, retail, and beyond.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Let's say it's a cold night, after a quick freeze in early January. You're woken up at 3 a.m. by a loud booming noise and the house shakes.

iStock

It seems like real winter may have finally arrived in Vermont. But what about the long-term forecast? Not the prospects for the weekend, but what the state's climate is going to look like years, decades, or even centuries down the line. We're looking at what a rapidly changing climate is going to mean for our particular neck of the woods. 

Liam Connors / VPR

The mild winter is creating hardship for many who rely on the income from snow and skiing-related jobs.  

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The lack of snow is disappointing for skiers, but it’s also a problem for the several thousand people who depend on Vermont ski resorts for seasonal work; many resorts are reducing hours or delaying the start of those employees, while other resorts are having to get creative in the way they put staff to work.

Ville de Laval

We know salt helps keep icy roads safe, but the salt itself has some negative side effects on the environment – and our cars. In Quebec, the city of Laval is experimenting with a special, alternative additive: white beet extract.

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