2018 Winter Olympics: Vermonters In Pyeongchang, South Korea

Credit Photo: Felipe Dana, AP; Illustration: Emily Alfin Johnson, VPR

The 2018 Winter Olympics kick off Feb. 8 in Pyeongchang, South Korea, and over a dozen Olympians have ties to Vermont, with many more having trained or gone to school here.

In fact, Vermont is tied for sixth among states sending the most Olympic athletes in Team USA this year (Colorado takes first, in case you were curious!)

Meet The 2018 Vermont Olympians

To help you keep track of local athletes as they compete in Pyeongchang, we've gathered their bios by team:

Alpine Skiing | Biathlon | Bobsleigh & Luge | Cross-Country Skiing | Freestyle Skiing | Ice Hockey | Snowboard

We'll be keeping track of the results every weekday morning on the Sports Report and on VPR's Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Vermonter Mikaela Shiffrin at last year's Alpine Skiing World Championships. Her first event in Pyeongchang is scheduled for Monday, Feb. 12.
Credit Marco Trovati / AP/File

Mark Reis / Team USA

The 2018 Winter Paralympics are under way in South Korea. These games follow the Olympics every four years and showcase the highest level competition for athletes with a variety of impairments in events that include alpine and cross country skiing, snowboarding, biathlon and ice hockey.

Jessica Diggins, a Stratton Mountain School alum, immediately after winning the gold medal in women's team sprint freestyle cross-country skiing with teammate Kikkan Randall. It's the first U.S. medal in cross-country since 1976.
Matthias Schrader / AP

With only handful of events remaining in the final weekend of the 23rd Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, the United States has delivered a steady, if mildly disappointing performance.

In the last event of her last Olympics – she has been to five – Kikkan Randall finally did what no American woman had ever done: win a medal in cross-country skiing. And she made it a gold, as Randall and her teammate Jessica Diggins won the team sprint free final at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

Updated at 3 a.m. ET Thursday

The U.S. women's hockey team owns Olympic gold for the first time in 20 years, after breaking Canada's remarkable streak of success in a gripping final at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. The only previous U.S. win had come in the tournament's first year, in 1998.

When the American women finally received their gold medals, they were placed on their necks by former player Angela Ruggiero, who was on the last U.S. Olympic team to win it all.

Hannah Dreissigacker introduces a group of young skiers to the Craftsbury Outdoor Center's shooting range.
courtesy Judy Geer

The Craftsbury Outdoor Center, in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, has trained six athletes competing in the Pyeongchang Olympics. That’s about half the winter athletes on the Center’s Green Racing Project team.

I recently happened upon a statement by a top Fox News exec that went something like this: In Olympics, let's focus on the winner of the race and not the race of the winner.

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET

The U.S. women's ice hockey team dismantled Finland in their semifinals matchup at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics on Monday, scoring goals early and often and claiming a spot in the gold medal game, where they will face Canada.

The U.S. team scored two goals in each of the first two periods; a pair of scores came in less than one minute in the second period.

It’s such a joy to see the long list of Vermonters representing at the Olympic Games and fun to see the stories on so many athletes from Norwich. I grew up there with a generation of Olympic skiers and must be some sort of slacker.

Mikaela Shiffrin overcame both delays and some of the best skiers in the world to claim her first gold medal at the 2018 Winter Olympics, winning the giant slalom. The weather finally cooperated, with sunny, clear skies over the Yongpyong Alpine Center in Pyeongchang.

Norway's Ragnhild Mowinckel won silver, 0.39 behind Shiffrin's combined time of 2:20.02.

Emily Dreissigacker at a competition earlier this year in Germany.
Matthias Schrader / Associated Press

When she was younger, Emily Dreissigacker would sometimes head up to the attic of her family's home, searching for memorabilia that her mother, Judy Geer, had brought back from her time as a member of two US Olympic rowing teams.

Jonathan Hayward / AP

Our region has 28 athletes in the mix: Vermont is in the upper echelon of representation with 13 athletes, and another 15 with ties to the area.

It's the biggest smorgasbord on TV. NBC and its related platforms are serving up more than 2,400 hours of Olympics coverage through the closing ceremony on Feb. 25 — a record for a Winter Olympics. It's all there in front of you, but figuring out what you want and when you want it is a challenge. Here are a few ideas on sorting through it all:

How To Watch On TV

Olympian Sophie Caldwell in a photo outdoors with her grandfather John Caldwell.
Courtesy

You don't have to go far to pass the torch to the next generation of great athletes in Vermont, because in the Green Mountain State, Olympic bloodlines are all in the family.

Courtesy

As the Winter Olympics kicks off, the U.S. Women's cross-country ski team — including those with ties to Vermont like Ida Sargent, Jessie Diggins, Liz Stephen, Sophie Caldwell, Kaitlynn Miller, and Caitlin Patterson — is favored to bring home a number of medals.

Hannah Kearney of Norwich won a gold medal in the 2010 Winter Olympic and a bronze in 2014.
Bela Szandelszky / AP

As the Winter Olympics begin this week in Pyeongchang, South Korea, the U.S. team — as usual — will have a significant contingent of Vermonters. It's easy to forget how many world-class winter athletes live in the state. And many of them come from a single Vermont town.

Reese Brown / US Ski and Snowboard

A group of ten men and women — the most of any sport — from Vermont are headed to PyeongChang, South Korea as members of Team USA's cross-country skiing team, this year.

Sarah Brunson / US Ski and Snowboard

Vermont is sending two seasoned Olympians to compete in PyeongChang, South Korea, for the US Snowboarding Team.

US Ski and Snowboard

The USA Freestyle Skiing Team includes three Vermonters, two of whom are representing their country at the Olympics for the very first time.

Steven Kornreich / US Ski and Snowboard

One Vermonter heading to PyeongChang this month is an alpine skier with a name that evokes its own bit of Olympic history. Ryan Cochran-Siegle's mother Barbara Ann Cochran won gold in the 1972 Olympic slalom. Now Cochran-Siegle, 25, who grew up in Starksboro is competing in his first Olympics.

Ally Eames / USA Hockey

The Catamounts will be well represented in Pyeongchang, South Korea for the 2018 Winter Olympics: Members of the Men's and Women's of the U.S. Ice Hockey Team played for the University of Vermont.

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