Arts & Culture

VPR reporting on Arts & Culture in the region. Follow the Weekly Conversation On The Arts and Art Hounds.

St. Albans Museum, courtesy

You can fill your social calendar up with a little bit of music in the meadow, a little shop of horrors, a traveling Hamilton exhibit and a brass quintet.

Ben Stoll, 17, wrote this poem about the song he and his younger brother would listen to on the drive to work at a berry farm, which was their first paying job.
Susan Reid, courtesy

Could you play that one song?
You know the one I’m talking about.
You know,
the one we blared from the car stereo,
with all the windows rolled down so all could hear,
the song we would play picking blueberries
in that all-natural,
weed-choked
berry farm.

Montpelier-based musician Ben Dunham hand-picked a dozen musicians to form The Backline Collective. The group performs the songs Dunham penned and the album-release party is Friday night at Positive Pie in Montpelier.
Tommy Burns/Matrix Marketing, courtesy

Local songwriter Ben Dunham's eight new songs chart his own personal growth over the past year. But in order to record them in all their multiple shades and moods, he needed to enlist a diverse bunch of Vermont musicians to get the job done. The finished project, called Backline Collective, will premiere at an album-release party this Friday night in Montpelier.

Eva Mondon, in foreground, listens to a recording she made about the Andrew's Inn at an exhibit at Next Stage Arts in Putney. A portrait of Mondon hangs on the wall.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Andrew's Inn, a gay bar in Bellows Falls that was open from 1973 through 1984, is the subject of a new oral history project that features the voices and stories of people who worked at and went to the club.

The film follows the story of a Syrian, single mother who with her children makes her way from Lebanon to Germany. The family crossed to Greece the same day, now world-famous 3-year-old Alan Kurdi drowned along the same route.
courtesy

In commemoration of World Refugee Day Tuesday, the grassroots group Rutland Welcomes is presenting a free screening of the documentary "8 Borders, 8 Days," which tells the story of a Syrian refugee and her two young children living in Lebanon.

Tyne Daly, John Procaccino, Director Adrienne Campbell-Holt and Tim Daly are teaming up to present the world premiere of "Downstairs," a play written especially for siblings Tim and Tyne Daly.
courtesy

The Dorset Theatre Festival kicks off its 40th anniversary season this week with Hollywood star power — brother and sister style. Siblings Tim and Tyne Daly will star on stage together for the first time in the world-premiere of a play about siblings.

Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

A teen who believes she can see into the mind of a serial killer, a feminist take on Death of a Salesman through poetry, and a collection of interlocking short stories set in Sweden. All three are subjects of the books nominated for this year’s Vermont Book Award.

Young Writers Project: 'Her'

Jun 16, 2017
Eva Rawlings, a rising senior from South Burlington, writes about triumphing over an eating disorder and finally feeling free. She read this piece at Poem City in Montpelier in April.
Susan Reid, courtesy

Look at her scars, they are not mine.
Wrists smell of blood, and of perfume and wine.
It stings me to think how one’s eyes get so cold,
Wrinkles her brow, makes her look far too old.

In Vermont's most French-settled community, Winooski is the site for French Heritage Day next Saturday, June 25.
French Heritage Day Society Facebook, courtesy

Take in a locally-made documentary, an outdoor concert, some circus arts and celebrate French heritage in the state's most French-settled community.

We're talking about summer reading on "Vermont Edition," and we want to hear your recommendations.
sensay / iStock

Vermont Edition's annual summer reading show is here! We're offering up a smorgasbord of book recommendations from readers, which means we want to hear from you.

Former journalist Stephen Kiernan is the author of three novels and two works of nonfiction.
Nancy Winship Miliken / HarperCollins, Courtesy

Morally fraught historical events can lead to compulsion to wonder, "What would I have done in those circumstances?" Vermont writer Stephen Kiernan's new novel, The Baker's Secret, unspools the transformation of its heroine Emma from a normal teenager to a clever, but desperate, survivor of German occupation.

Over 200 years ago, the Spitfire, a Revolutionary War-era gunship, sank to the bottom of Lake Champlain after being damaged during the Battle of Valcour Island. Now, researchers are proposing a plan to raise the ship, restore it and put it on display.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/File

A gunship that sank during battle more than two centuries ago might finally be resurfaced from the depths of Lake Champlain and put on display.

Norwich Vt. is known for its architecture, especially Federal and Greek Revival - but Mid-Century Modern, not so much.

Author Howard Norman lives in East Calais. He spoke to "Vermont Edition" recently about his latest novel, "My Darling Detective."
Emma Norman / Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Courtesy

East Calais author Howard Norman's love of noir crime literature and film is clearly evident in his latest novel, My Darling Detective.

Students from Lynda Siegel's ESL class are learning water safety through a free course at the Greater Burlington YMCA.
Doug Bishop/Greater Burlington YMCA, courtesy

For many Vermonters, swimming is learned early and central to summer fun. But for children who are new to the United States and still learning English, swimming can be a completely foreign concept.

"Before We Sleep" author Jeffrey Lent says he's fascinated by history and how it shapes the present day.
Jack Rowell, courtesy

In his latest novel, Before We Sleep, Vermont author Jeffrey Lent tells the story of how one man's experience serving in World War II shapes not only his life, but that of his wife and daughter. Lent spoke with Vermont Edition about his writing process and why stories from the past preoccupy him.

The most recent issue of Vermont Life magazine. The publication is currently $3 million in debt, and that's led lawmakers to question the state-owned publication's future.
Henry Epp / VPR

In 2017, should the state of Vermont still be supporting a promotional magazine? That’s a question lawmakers put forward in this year’s state budget.

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