Arts & Culture

VPR reporting on Arts & Culture in the region. Follow the Weekly Conversation On The Arts and Art Hounds.

The town of Hartford will vote next year on whether to change the name of the October holiday "Columbus Day" to "Indigenous People's Day."

Young Writers Project: A Mother's Love

May 4, 2017
Courtesy, Susan Reid

Abby Simmons, a high school junior from St. Albans, writes about the incredible power of a mother’s love.

She loves like water
Beneath our feet
Above our heads
Coursing through our bodies.
Ever present.

Her love shines
Like the warm sun above,
Touching all those
On this side of the earth.
Radiant.

In her soul,
Lies an endless mine
Full of passion
That will never run out.

My Place: Tim Hardin

May 4, 2017
Courtesy, Joel Najman

During the dawning of the folk-rock era of the mid-to-late 1960's, singer/songwriter Tim Hardin wrote some of the most enduring confessional songs of love and life.

Courtesy, David Schein

What began as a theater space in the Ethiopian city of Awassa to educate community members about HIV/AIDS has strong Vermont ties.

WCAX-TV, Vermont’s CBS affiliate, has been sold for $29 million to a Georgia company by the family that founded the station in 1954, according a WCAX news report.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP file

Sent from Vermont to Washington as a U.S. senator for the first time in 1974, Patrick Leahy has served longer than any other current member of the Senate.

Sarah Priestap / Valley News

Is it ever against the law for something to be ugly? If you don't like a building going up next to your house, do you have any power to stop it?

 We're talking about what rights individuals, communities and regions have to control the appearance of a changing landscape - and who gets to decide what passes muster.

University of Vermont, courtesy

The University of Vermont is offering a reward for information about the theft of a rhinoceros horn from the university campus.

Marcelo Krasilcic / Nonesuch Records

The Magnetic Fields formed in 1989 in the Boston area. Their seminal CD, 69 Love Songs, made them the darlings of rock critics a decade later. The band is fronted by lead singer, songwriter and producer Stephin Merritt, who lived for awhile in Vermont as a child.

Lindsay Raymondjack Photography / Courtesy Vermont Stage

Adoption is emotional process that's even more layered when parents adopt a child from another culture. The family's attention to race, privilege, language and cultural expectations will be forever changed. Those are some of the themes of a current production by Vermont Stage.

Nina Keck / VPR

Rutland's Wonderfeet Kids' Museum was launched by volunteers in an empty downtown storefront in 2011. As its role in the community has grown, officials hope an ambitious fundraiser scheduled for this weekend will help the museum further expand its services.

Beltrami Studios

Finally heeding her then pre-teen daughters' book recommendations to read the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling, Montpelier author Laurie Forest devoured and loved the books. And then she stepped into a writing realm that was entirely new to her: Fantasy fiction.

Courtesy, Joel Najman

Drummer Hal Blaine is a charter member of Los Angeles's elite group of first-call studio musicians know collectively as "The Wrecking Crew."

Courtesy, Susan Reid

Sophia Cannizzaro, 17, of West Glover, writes about the importance of achieving balance and how tricky it can be to get there.

A Studs Terkel musical onstage in Middlebury, chamber singers in Lebanon and the student film slam awards in St. Johnsbury.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

A group of students at the University of Vermont is finishing up a semester in a class where they were encouraged to fail early and often in order to ultimately succeed in solving a problem.

A street corner in downtown Brattleboro, Vermont
J. Stephen Conn / Flickr Creative Commons

Think about ideal images of downtowns and village centers, and a few ideas will come to mind – thriving storefronts, neighbors bumping into each other and public places for people to gather. Author Philip Langdon might argue that's the result when we design our downtowns to be walkable.

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