Arts & Culture

VPR reporting on Arts & Culture in the region. Follow the Weekly Conversation On The Arts and Art Hounds.

The Guildhall Public Library dates from 1901. We're talking about how libraries fund the services they provide to Vermonters.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Among many other records, Vermont can boast more public libraries per person than any other state in the union. How those libraries get their funding is far from uniform; it can vary greatly from town to town. We're talking about how libraries get the money they use, how they deal with funding challenges, and how it all affects the services they offer to Vermonters.

Men panning for gold in an 1887 photograph from the Plymouth Historical Society.
E. G. Davis / Plymouth Historical Society, courtesy

You've probably heard about the California gold rush of 1849 — but did you know that Vermont had its own mini-gold rush beginning around that same time?

The New England Center For Circus Arts' summer camp has been proceeding through the turmoil. About 6,000 people take lessons over the year.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The executive director and president of the board of directors agreed to step down from the leadership of New England Center for Circus Arts.

The steeple on the Unitarian Universalist church at the head of Church Street in Burlington.
Historic American Buildings Survey / Library of Congress

A simple question about the history of Burlington's Church Street yielded some interesting trivia about the city, and the commercial district that now defines downtown.

Serenity Smith Forchion, left, and her twin sister Elsie Smith started the New England Center for Circus Arts in Brattleboro. A volunteer board fired them this week.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The New England Center For Circus Arts board of directors has fired the organization's founders, and supporters are rallying to their defense as the group faces an uncertain future.

Burlington-based band Swale has been together for 15 years. In July, they released their third album, "There's No One Here."
Shem Roose, Courtesy

Broadly speaking, the Burlington-based band Swale plays rock songs — though labeling their music that way is a little like filling a paint palette with just one color. 

People of all abilities can find hiking trails to suit them in Vermont. (Some are muddier than others.)
Patti Daniels / VPR

These long summer days in Vermont are fantastic, but how do you get the most out of the season without breaking the bank? We crowd-sourced your ideas for inexpensive — better yet, free! — ways to enjoy summer.

Remember Rhode Island’s disastrous deal with former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling? The state invested $75 million of taxpayer dollars in Schilling’s video game company 38 Studios and lost it all before a lawsuit clawed back most of the money. It was one of the worst financial decisions in Rhode Island history. Yet the company that served as the state’s financial adviser on the deal has continued doing business throughout the state.

Last year's Do Good Fest welcomed over 5,000 spectators on the lawn at National Life headquarters in Montpelier. Again this year, the event is free and the $20 parking fee benefits Branches of Hope.
National Life, courtesy

This Saturday, the National Life building in Montpelier is opening up its "back lawn" and inviting a few friends over. It's the 4th Annual Do Good Fest, underwritten by the financial services company and boasting a musical line-up of national and local performers.

The 12th ShazamFest takes place this weekend, just a two-and-a-half-hour drive from the Burlington, Vermont area. The music festival boasts a wide variety of acts and performers, food and camping in a family-friendly atmosphere.
Mike Rigby, artist

This weekend is an overflowing clown-car full of arts events for every taste! Try an environmentally friendly music, arts and sports fest across the border in Québec, a block party in Waterbury or a play on the boards in Weston.

An angled upstairs window, or "witch window," on a house in Wolcott, Vermont.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

You might have seen this architectural oddity on an old Vermont farmhouse, even if you didn’t know what to call it. 

A new poetry collection titled "Roads Taken: Contemporary Vermont Poetry" was co-edited by current Vermont Poet Laureate Chard deNiord and former Vermont Poet Laureate Sydney Lea. Chard deNiord spoke to "Vermont Edition" about the new book.
Green Writers Press, courtesy

Well before he became Vermont Poet Laureate, Chard deNiord thought there was a need for an anthology of modern Vermont poetry. Vermont is chock-full of poets, he thought, and it would be great to have a collection that would give people an idea of what's out there.

In the 1850s, a small but vibrant community grew up around a gold mining operation in the Plymouth-Bridgewater area. Called Plymouth Five Corners, it had a hotel, a school and a dance hall.
E.G. Davis / Plymouth Historical Society

This month on Brave Little State, we’re doing things a little differently. Instead of taking on one of your questions about Vermont, we’re taking on three — in a kind of local history lightning round.

Two large flake tools were found at the former Galick Farm in West Haven. The South Champlain Historical Ecology Project is conducting a dig in the Helen W. Bruckner Nature Preserve.
Melody Bodette / VPR

A team of archeologists is conducting a dig at one of the most remote farms in Vermont this summer. The South Champlain Historical Ecology Project is digging in West Haven for the second summer, and its early findings include some objects that may date back almost 11,000 years.

Boston Red Sox third baseman Tzu-Wei Lin swings at a pitch during the 8th inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers on Tuesday, July 4, 2017, in Arlington, Texas. We're talking about what's coming in the second half of the season.
Michael Ainsworth / Associated Press

The Red Sox started the baseball season sluggish, but now they're fired up. The Yankees meanwhile, got off to a great start but now they're floundering. On this episode of Vermont Edition, it's our annual summer baseball show!

Lauren Palmer, courtesy

From outdoor concerts on meeting house lawns to open artists' studios, this weekend is packed with plenty to do in Vermont's arts-rich regions!

Melody Bodette / VPR

A Charlotte family is working to turn their family farm into a non-profit to celebrate African-American heritage and culture. The Clemmons family has a long history of bringing communities together and celebrating African art and culture, and now they are finalists for a grant to expand their vision.

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