Environment

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A scientific panel has supported a federal report that upgrades the health effects of the chemical PFOA.

The Village of Swanton is planning to upgrade an old dam to generate hydroelectric power, but the state's Agency of Natural Resources says it can't support the plan without getting answers to some key environmental questions.

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Pollution in Lake Champlain could lead to a significant decrease in the value of lakeside homes and a notable loss of tourism dollars being spent in the region, according to a new study.

Gov. Peter Shumlin says PFOA has been detected in Shaftsbury. The Department of Environmental Conservation tested a monitoring well near the closed Shaftsbury landfill and found levels of PFOA slightly above the state advisory level.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

Vermont's utility regulators are holding a hearing next month in one of the final legal challenges to the Vermont Gas Systems pipeline project, and the public isn’t allowed to attend.

Vermont Gas Systems has been saying that the company's pipeline to Addison County will be finished and in service by the end of this year, but now its top executive is expressing doubts about that.

On Monday's Vermont Edition, Vermont Gas CEO Don Rendall said the pipeline will be completed "when we can resolve Geprags Park and have that piece of the puzzle available for us to connect the pipeline from the north and the south."

Four Vermont environmental groups are teaming up to formally oppose the renovation of a dam in Swanton.

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire think blue-green algae blooms may be contributing to the declining population of loons in certain New Hampshire lakes.

While scientists have long warned humans to stay clear of algae or cyanobacteria blooms, researchers at UNH now suspect they may be harming New Hampshire’s loon population. While the state’s overall loon population has been steadily rebounding each year, some lakes are still seeing losses.

Nina Keck / VPR

Earlier this summer, thousands of members of the Rainbow Family of Living Light, a loose affiliation of peace activists, made their way to the Green Mountain National Forest for their annual celebration of nature and hippie culture. This year’s festivities peaked around the Fourth of July, but the gathering is still winding down.

The weather in Vermont this summer has been volatile – hot and muggy, then pouring rain. We've already experienced several over 90 degree days in parts of the state.

Andrew Loconto, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Burlington, joined Vermont Edition to talk about the recent weather conditions, as well as what we typically experience during Vermont summers.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR file

Congress has passed a national GMO labeling bill that would nullify Vermont's labeling law, which went into effect July 1. 

File Photo/Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife

The Village of Swanton has ambitious plans to redevelop an old dam across the Missisquoi River as a hydroelectric facility, but environmental groups say the dam is threatening the downstream ecosystem and should be removed.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR file

Officials implementing Vermont's universal recycling law say they've seen a 5 percent decrease in trash statewide. Act 148 has banned recyclable materials from landfills for over a year now, and the state is now implementing the next phase of requirements in the law, dealing with yard and leaf debris.

Evie Lovett

A new art show in Brattleboro attempts to strengthen the town's relationship with the Connecticut River.

Angela Evancie / VPR

A state regulatory body is about to recalibrate electricity prices for many renewable energy projects in Vermont, and advocates for solar power say the proposed changes could dismantle a critical industry.

Courtesy University of Vermont

Wetlands and floodplains along Otter Creek protected Middlebury from more than $1.8 million of flood damage during Tropical Storm Irene, according to a new study from the University of Vermont.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

It’s that time of year again. Reports of potentially toxic cyanobacteria, also known as blue green algae, have started coming in to the state of Vermont, and Burlington officials closed part of North Beach because of the bacteria.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A special vote next week to elect a member of the Grafton Select Board will be a bellwether for how the town feels about co-hosting what would become Vermont's largest wind project.

A collage of food labels
Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Vermont’s GMO labeling law aims to provide consumers with more information, and yet it's just one of a growing number of food labels popping up on grocery shelves.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Vermont has became the first state in the nation to require special labeling for foods made with genetically modified ingredients. But even as lawmakers enact new GMO regulations, this state’s agriculture sector is wholeheartedly embracing the use of GMO crops. And a new report suggests that the use of herbicides has gone up drastically as a result.

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