Environment

A survey from the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department assesses Vermonter's opinions on a variety of issues. We're talking about the results.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department has just released a new comprehensive survey that examines how Vermonters look at issues including fishing, hunting, trapping and wildlife preservation. We’re looking at these results and what they mean for the future of the state's wildlife.

Drivers from Burlington cross the bridge over the Winooski River Tuesday afternoon.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

In 1996, the Northeastern U.S saw a sudden increase in the number of "extreme precipitation" events. And ever since then, that number has stayed elevated. So a group of researchers at Dartmouth College set out to figure out why.

The Vermont Gas pipeline to Addison County has been completed, but state regulators are looking into allegations of shoddy construction.
John Van Hoesen / VPR File

Vermont Gas wants to bury gas lines on public rights of way in the town of Bristol, but some residents say the town should have asked them first.

Weis: The Last Straw

Aug 16, 2018
Russ Weis

Einstein famously said, “We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” And lately, I’ve been trying to apply that deceptively simple-sounding bit of wisdom to the significant environmental problem of accumulating plastic.

Lucas Campbell operates one of the few landing crafts on Lake Champlain. Here, he readies the boat to take off from Burton Island State Park.
Henry Epp / VPR

Lake Champlain has a long history as a commercial waterway. In the 1800s, it was a crowded passage for boats hauling lumber and other goods between New York City and Montreal and points in between.

Much of that industry is long gone, but there's still some work on the lake for those who want it.

The Passumpsic River overflowed its banks in 2002, washing out roads and flooding homes in and around Lyndonville in 2002.
Vermont Emergency Management, courtesy

Flooding is Vermont’s most frequent and costly natural disaster, but seven years after the devastation of Tropical Storm Irene, just how ready are homeowners and towns for future floods? We're talking about the threat of flooding in Vermont and planning for flood resilience.

Martha Molnar

When we moved to the so-called Lake District in south central Vermont, we didn’t realize what that meant. A full decade later, we’re still discovering the beautiful lakes and their generous four-season offerings.

Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard, left, and Vermont Gov. Phil Scott sign a bilateral agreement Sunday in Stow
John Dillon / VPR

New England governors and premiers from eastern Canadian provinces plan to stress cross-border cooperation, not confrontation when they gather this week in Stowe.

The EPA this week began testing air and soil samples in Burlington's Old North End for the presence of two chemicals commonly used in dry cleaning products.
Ari Snider / VPR

The Environmental Protection Agency is testing the soil and air in a Burlington neighborhood for the presence of potentially hazardous chemicals.

Vermont Yankee employees move the last of the plant's spent nuclear fuel into storage casks.
Courtesy / Entergy

Four years after the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant shut down, the last of its spent nuclear waste has been sealed away in storage casks and sent to a new facility near the Connecticut River.

VPR's John Dillon reported on the spent fuel transfer and talked about it with Vermont Edition.

On a quiet street by Green Hill Pond in Charlestown about a mile away from the ocean, Andrew Baer walks onto his front lawn and asks for help sliding the cap off his well. Luckily, he's having solar panels installed and there are plenty of hands at-the-ready. 

Lange: Quiniktikut

Aug 6, 2018
Rick Shreve of Orford, NH

Thanks to Daniel Webster, the border of the United States in New Hampshire is a few rods north of a tiny abandoned beaver dam that's the source of the Connecticut River.

An open water view of the Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge.
Lynne McCrea / VPR

Situated on Lake Champlain in northwestern Vermont, the Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge is recognized internationally for its biological diversity and high-quality wetlands.

Vermont Yankee transferred the last of its spent nuclear fuel this week for storage in steel and concrete casks.
Entergy, courtesy

Vermont Yankee has moved the last of its spent nuclear fuel into huge steel and concrete casks where it will be stored for decades near the Connecticut River in southern Vermont.

An electric vehicle being charged.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

A Vermont environmental official said a Trump administration plan to freeze fuel efficiency requirements for cars and trucks will hurt the state's efforts to control greenhouse gas emissions.

Recyclables from Chittenden County are sorted at this facility in Williston.
John Dillon / VPR

Upheavals in global markets will soon be felt in Vermonters’ pocketbooks. The international market for some recyclable material has crashed, and that has forced some municipalities and solid waste companies to start charging for recycling.

Updated at 11:58 a.m. ET

The Trump administration has proposed a rollback of Obama-era fuel efficiency and emissions standards, while simultaneously taking aim at California's unique ability to set more stringent rules.

Under the Obama administration, the Environmental Protection Agency called for the fuel economy standards for new vehicles to ratchet up over time. The increasingly strict standards were designed to combat climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Burlington Community Boathouse Marina view from the lake on a blue-sky day.
Meg Malone / VPR

July was the hottest month ever recorded in Burlington, Vermont, according to records from the local office of the National Weather Service.

Krupp: Crazy Snake Worms

Aug 1, 2018

When I dig in my garden soil in spring, I look forward to seeing earthworms, since I know they add to the humus in the soil with their castings.

Paul Costello, left, and Peter Walke, are co-chairs of the governor's Vermont Climate Action Commission, which met for the first time Tuesday. They say Vermont can use emissions-reduction initiatives to advance the state economy.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

A report out Tuesday recommended ways the state of Vermont can reduce greenhouse gas emissions while also encouraging economic growth.

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