Environment

President Donald Trump this week ordered a review of the U.S. Antiquities Act. The move could impact the Atlantic Ocean's first-ever marine national monument, created last fall.

The company that's suspected of contaminating water with the chemical PFOA has agreed to pay for the next level of engineering study for a municipal water extension.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

In the northeast U.S., there is less than 1 percent of old growth forest left. A new University of Vermont study finds that harvesting trees in a way that mimics old growth forests not only restores critical habitat, but also stores a surprising amount of carbon.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Bennington residents who have been dealing with contaminated water are starting to get frustrated with the state's ability to find a long-term solution to their problem.

jtyler / iStock

Obvious signs of spring can take a while to present themselves here in the north country. Trees are slow to form buds and leaves. Flowers won't be pushing up through the cold ground for a while yet.

But one great sign of spring has revealed itself. The birds have returned.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

Rain or shine, local scientists and supporters say they will be turning out in multiple locations in Vermont—and across the country— to speak up for science on Saturday.

Millions of river herring used to return to New England's fresh waterways to spawn, but at some collection spots today, populations have dropped into the dozens. 

Chris and Martin Kratt performing their live 'Wild Kratts' show on stage.
Courtesy of Wild Kratts Live

The Kratt brothers have introduced kids across the country to a love of animals and nature through a series of wildly popular TV shows, including Kratts' Creatures, Zoboomafoo and now Wild Kratts.

Roy Pilcher

The arrival of the American Woodcock is one of the exciting signs of spring in Vermont.

A bootprint in the mud.
photosoup / iStockphoto.com

Vermonters may be looking for a chance to explore the great outdoors now that it's springtime, but venturing out on a hike during the mud season could actually cause damage to trails.

Steve Zind / VPR

A developer and conservation groups have reached an agreement that will preserve prime agricultural land at Exit 4 on Interstate 89, ending a controversial plan to build a large development at the Randolph Exit.

A Hanover couple has reached a settlement with Dartmouth College after their groundwater was contaminated by a former hazardous waste site.

Just a few days ago, a black vulture appeared above Walpole, New Hampshire, thirty-seven years after I confirmed the first turkey vulture nest in northern New England.

In order to better understand why our roads turn to soup about now, here’s a short Mud Season 101.

Elaine Thompson / AP

If you had to pay a fee whenever you needed a plastic bag at the checkout, would it prompt you to remember a reusable bag? What if plastic bags were altogether banned? On the next Vermont Edition, we look at different efforts to reduce flimsy plastic bags.

The University of Vermont announced Tuesday the creation of a university-wide environmental institute.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

A group of Democrats in Montpelier are introducing set of new bills to tax fossil fuels with the aim of discouraging environmentally damaging activities while easing other tax burdens on Vermonters, or simply putting the money back in Vermonters’ pockets.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR feil

The U.S. Supreme Court recently decided it will continue to hear a controversial case about which water bodies the Environmental Protection Agency can regulate, even after President Trump asked them to hold off. Vermont is one of eight states that has filed to defend the EPA rule.  

Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

April showers bring hundreds of thousands of gallons of untreated water into Lake Champlain, it turns out.

Toby Talbot / AP

The Public Service Board has approved the sale of 13 hydroelectric stations along the Connecticut and Deerfield rivers to a Boston-based investment firm. The board issued its decision Thursday.

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