Environment

Rainbow steelhead trout leaps out of the water.
Vermont Fish & Wildlife, Courtesy

Once a year, for about 10 days from mid-April through early May, nature offers a free show that provides viewers the chance to "oooh" and "aaah." It's the steelhead rainbow trout run, when the fish hurtle up the falls to get upstream to spawn.

Sarah Priestap / Valley News

Is it ever against the law for something to be ugly? If you don't like a building going up next to your house, do you have any power to stop it?

 We're talking about what rights individuals, communities and regions have to control the appearance of a changing landscape - and who gets to decide what passes muster.

University of Vermont, courtesy

The University of Vermont is offering a reward for information about the theft of a rhinoceros horn from the university campus.

A bunch of periwinkles
Jane Lindholm / VPR

It's not often you get to eat gourmet food for college credit. One lucky class at the University of Vermont was recently treated to such a meal, but with a twist – the dishes featured invasive species.

Alden Pellett / Associated Press

Wild turkeys were once extirpated from the Vermont landscape because of over-hunting and loss of forest land. Now they number somewhere between 50,000 and 60,000.

Levin: Way Too Soon

May 1, 2017

This year I made a bet with a friend about when we’d first hear spring peepers in our respective valleys.

Over 200 years ago, the Spitfire, a Revolutionary War-era gunship, sank to the bottom of Lake Champlain after being damaged during the Battle of Valcour Island. Now, researchers are proposing a plan to raise the ship, restore it and put it on display.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/File

A former regulator at the Environmental Protection Agency says budget cuts proposed by President Donald Trump would have a “devastating” impact on efforts to reduce the flow of pollution into Lake Champlain and other Vermont water bodies.

A new Vermont Supreme Court case brought by the Conservation Law Foundation is challenging the legality of the regulatory permit that allowed Vermont Gas to build a 41-mile pipeline into Addison County.

President Donald Trump this week ordered a review of the U.S. Antiquities Act. The move could impact the Atlantic Ocean's first-ever marine national monument, created last fall.

The company that's suspected of contaminating water with the chemical PFOA has agreed to pay for the next level of engineering study for a municipal water extension.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

In the northeast U.S., there is less than 1 percent of old growth forest left. A new University of Vermont study finds that harvesting trees in a way that mimics old growth forests not only restores critical habitat, but also stores a surprising amount of carbon.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Bennington residents who have been dealing with contaminated water are starting to get frustrated with the state's ability to find a long-term solution to their problem.

jtyler / iStock

Obvious signs of spring can take a while to present themselves here in the north country. Trees are slow to form buds and leaves. Flowers won't be pushing up through the cold ground for a while yet.

But one great sign of spring has revealed itself. The birds have returned.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

Rain or shine, local scientists and supporters say they will be turning out in multiple locations in Vermont—and across the country— to speak up for science on Saturday.

Millions of river herring used to return to New England's fresh waterways to spawn, but at some collection spots today, populations have dropped into the dozens. 

Chris and Martin Kratt performing their live 'Wild Kratts' show on stage.
Courtesy of Wild Kratts Live

The Kratt brothers have introduced kids across the country to a love of animals and nature through a series of wildly popular TV shows, including Kratts' Creatures, Zoboomafoo and now Wild Kratts.

Roy Pilcher

The arrival of the American Woodcock is one of the exciting signs of spring in Vermont.

A bootprint in the mud.
photosoup / iStockphoto.com

Vermonters may be looking for a chance to explore the great outdoors now that it's springtime, but venturing out on a hike during the mud season could actually cause damage to trails.

Steve Zind / VPR

A developer and conservation groups have reached an agreement that will preserve prime agricultural land at Exit 4 on Interstate 89, ending a controversial plan to build a large development at the Randolph Exit.

A Hanover couple has reached a settlement with Dartmouth College after their groundwater was contaminated by a former hazardous waste site.

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