Government & Politics

Sandy Huffaker / AP

It’s only been a year since Bernie Sanders stood on the waterfront in Burlington to announce his bid for the presidency. But his impact on the Democratic Party he chose to run under has already been substantial, and many left-leaning Vermonters say Sanders’ candidacy is shifting the ideological balance of the Vermont Democratic Party. 

Angela Evancie / VPR

Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Lisman is trying to paint his opponent, Lt. Gov. Phil Scott, as being too cozy with Democrats.

Steve Zind / VPR

A five-and-a-half year study of Vermont State Police has found disparities in traffic stops that officials say point to racial bias.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

The U.S. House has given its strong bi-partisan support to legislation that overhauls a 40-year-old law that regulates toxic chemicals. The proposal will bring more than 64,000 chemicals under the review of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Toby Talbot / AP File Photo

Fifteen years ago today, a senator from Vermont triggered a political earthquake. Sen. Jim Jeffords declared his independence from the Republican party on May 24, 2001.

Yves BarriAre / iStock

When you think of drug use in Vermont, you probably think about the opioid epidemic. Back in 2014, Gov. Peter Shumlin dedicated his entire State of the State address to it. And the problem become a top priority for treatment professionals and law enforcement.

But sometimes, a crackdown on one drug makes the illegal drug market shift toward another, and Vermont authorities have noticed a surge in crack cocaine use and related violence.

Toby Talbot / AP

The election in November 2000 put President George W. Bush in the White House, but it also created a peculiar set of circumstances in the U.S. Senate: it was the first time since 1881 that the Senate was evenly split between two parties. And then, on May 24, 2001, Vermont Sen. Jim Jeffords changed everything.

Gov. Peter Shumlin has issued his first veto of the 2016 session. The governor says a bill expanding the membership of the state's Clean Water Fund Board could have slowed down efforts to clean up lakes and streams across the state.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Democratic candidate for governor Sue Minter has outlined a “plan to help grow Vermont’s economy” that calls for smarter use of existing programs to revitalize regional economies.

Friends of the Wardsboro Library

On Tuesday, Gov. Peter Shumlin will sign into law a bill proclaiming the Gilfeather Turnip the Vermont state vegetable. The town of Wardsboro, the mysterious turnip's ancestral home, couldn't be more pleased.

James Patterson / Valley News

State officials are trying to figure out if Vermont should make a bid for a 560-megawatt hydroelectric system on the Connecticut and Deerfield rivers. And the Agency of Natural Resources says the system will generate less revenue in the future as older facilities are upgraded to meet modern environmental laws.

Liam Connors / VPR

You might have noticed a few more police officers out patrolling Burlington streets this month. While foot patrols aren't new, Burlington's police Chief Brandon del Pozo increased the number of them at the beginning of May.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This week, new form-based zoning regulations went into effect in Shelburne. It’s a concept the town has been studying for over five years, in an effort to fight sprawl on Route 7.

Kristina Barker / AP

The issue of unpledged delegates, or superdelegates, as they’re called, will be hotly contested at the Democratic National Convention this July. But here in Vermont, Bernie Sanders’ supporters are ready to take matters into their own hands on the superdelegate front, even if the national party isn’t willing to act.

VPR's Bob Kinzel spoke with Vermont Press Bureau Chief Neal Goswami for an update on the presidential and statewide political campaigns. Goswami told Vermont Edition that "There appears to be a lot of discord in the Democratic Party."

Tulpahn / iStock

This weekend, both the Republican and Democratic parties will hold their state conventions to select delegates to their national conventions.

Andrew Harnik / AP

On Saturday afternoon, devoted Republicans from across the state will gather in Burlington. And while the purpose of the meeting is to select Vermont’s delegates to the Republican National Convention later this summer, party officials will also look to do some bridge building between the Republican voters who support Donald Trump, and the GOP candidates who do not.

Eric Rojas / AP

Vermont's top Democratic officials say they don't think Sen. Bernie Sanders’ continued presence in the Democratic presidential race is hurting the candidacy of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Years ago in San Francisco, I knew a lot of people who were transgender, only we didn’t call it such back then.

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